In "Effects of Childhood Asthma on the Development of Obesity among School-Aged Children," researchers report that young children with asthma were 51 percent more likely to become obese over the next decade as children who did not have asthma. The researchers also found that the use of asthma rescue medications reduced the risk of becoming obese by 43 percent.

"Asthma and obesity often occur together in children, but it is unclear whether children with asthma are at higher risk for onset of obesity or whether obese children develop asthma, or both, said Zhanghua Chen, PhD, lead study author and a postdoctoral research associate of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Our findings add to the literature that early-life asthma history may lead to increased risk of childhood obesity."

In their prospective study, Dr. Chen and her colleagues analyzed the records of 2,171 kindergarteners and first graders who were not obese at the time they enrolled in the Southern California Children's Health Study (CHS). At enrollment, 13.5 percent of the children had asthma. The children were followed for up to 10 years (average: 6.9 years). During that time, 15.8 percent of all the children enrolled in the study developed obesity. Researchers confirmed study results in a different group of children, recruited in the 4th grade to participate in the CHS.

With treatment, most people with asthma are able to live normal lives. But there are some simple tips to help you keep your symptoms under control.

It's important to take any prescribed medication regularly, as this can help keep your symptoms under control and prevent severe asthma attacks.

It's also important to use any inhalers and spacers you may have been prescribed properly. Make sure your GP or practice nurse shows you how to use your inhalers correctly.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Symptoms of asthma are variable. That means that they can be mild to severe, intermittent to chronic. The one point to remember is that even when symptoms are mild, asthma should not be ignored. Untreated or under treated, asthma can lead to severe respiratory distress and in rare cases, sudden death. Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood affecting 12.5% of children.

There are two types of triggers : allergic and non-allergic. Triggers are things in your environment that cause the inflammation and afterwards, tightening of the airway muscles. Triggers are everywhere. Triggers can be allergic such as dust mites or non allergic such as exercise, viral infections, smoke or other irritants. It is important to identify both allergic and non-allergic triggers and develop avoidance/ control strategies. Only those with allergic asthma have symptoms triggered by allergens such a pet dander, pollen and dust mites. About 80-90% of people living with asthma have allergic triggers.

Asthma is often caused by an allergic reaction to foreign substances that affect the respiratory tract. When individuals who are allergic come into contact with an allergen to which they are sensitive, their immune system then responds by releasing several chemicals including histamines, causing sneezing, runny noses, watery eyes and broncho-constriction. This is the way the body attempts to expel the allergen/s. Histamines have several effects, one of which is to cause bronchial smooth muscles to contract which in turn, makes exhaling more difficult. In a child with asthma, histamine can also trigger asthma symptoms.

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Spirometry article more useful, or one of our other health articles .

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, associated with widespread, variable outflow obstruction. Clinically, this manifests as [ 1 ] :

The outflow obstruction reverses either spontaneously or with medication. The underlying inflammation is associated with bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) or airway hyper-reactivity to a variety of stimuli (eg, environmental allergens and irritants).

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects your airways. Your airways are tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. If you have asthma, the inside walls of your airways become sore and swollen.

In the United States, about 20 million people have asthma . Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and trouble breathing, especially early in the morning or at night.

When asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it is called an asthma attack. Asthma is treated with two kinds of medicines: quick-relief medicines to stop asthma symptoms and long-term control medicines to prevent symptoms.

In "Effects of Childhood Asthma on the Development of Obesity among School-Aged Children," researchers report that young children with asthma were 51 percent more likely to become obese over the next decade as children who did not have asthma. The researchers also found that the use of asthma rescue medications reduced the risk of becoming obese by 43 percent.

"Asthma and obesity often occur together in children, but it is unclear whether children with asthma are at higher risk for onset of obesity or whether obese children develop asthma, or both, said Zhanghua Chen, PhD, lead study author and a postdoctoral research associate of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Our findings add to the literature that early-life asthma history may lead to increased risk of childhood obesity."

In their prospective study, Dr. Chen and her colleagues analyzed the records of 2,171 kindergarteners and first graders who were not obese at the time they enrolled in the Southern California Children's Health Study (CHS). At enrollment, 13.5 percent of the children had asthma. The children were followed for up to 10 years (average: 6.9 years). During that time, 15.8 percent of all the children enrolled in the study developed obesity. Researchers confirmed study results in a different group of children, recruited in the 4th grade to participate in the CHS.

With treatment, most people with asthma are able to live normal lives. But there are some simple tips to help you keep your symptoms under control.

It's important to take any prescribed medication regularly, as this can help keep your symptoms under control and prevent severe asthma attacks.

It's also important to use any inhalers and spacers you may have been prescribed properly. Make sure your GP or practice nurse shows you how to use your inhalers correctly.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Symptoms of asthma are variable. That means that they can be mild to severe, intermittent to chronic. The one point to remember is that even when symptoms are mild, asthma should not be ignored. Untreated or under treated, asthma can lead to severe respiratory distress and in rare cases, sudden death. Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood affecting 12.5% of children.

There are two types of triggers : allergic and non-allergic. Triggers are things in your environment that cause the inflammation and afterwards, tightening of the airway muscles. Triggers are everywhere. Triggers can be allergic such as dust mites or non allergic such as exercise, viral infections, smoke or other irritants. It is important to identify both allergic and non-allergic triggers and develop avoidance/ control strategies. Only those with allergic asthma have symptoms triggered by allergens such a pet dander, pollen and dust mites. About 80-90% of people living with asthma have allergic triggers.

Asthma is often caused by an allergic reaction to foreign substances that affect the respiratory tract. When individuals who are allergic come into contact with an allergen to which they are sensitive, their immune system then responds by releasing several chemicals including histamines, causing sneezing, runny noses, watery eyes and broncho-constriction. This is the way the body attempts to expel the allergen/s. Histamines have several effects, one of which is to cause bronchial smooth muscles to contract which in turn, makes exhaling more difficult. In a child with asthma, histamine can also trigger asthma symptoms.

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Spirometry article more useful, or one of our other health articles .

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, associated with widespread, variable outflow obstruction. Clinically, this manifests as [ 1 ] :

The outflow obstruction reverses either spontaneously or with medication. The underlying inflammation is associated with bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) or airway hyper-reactivity to a variety of stimuli (eg, environmental allergens and irritants).

In "Effects of Childhood Asthma on the Development of Obesity among School-Aged Children," researchers report that young children with asthma were 51 percent more likely to become obese over the next decade as children who did not have asthma. The researchers also found that the use of asthma rescue medications reduced the risk of becoming obese by 43 percent.

"Asthma and obesity often occur together in children, but it is unclear whether children with asthma are at higher risk for onset of obesity or whether obese children develop asthma, or both, said Zhanghua Chen, PhD, lead study author and a postdoctoral research associate of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Our findings add to the literature that early-life asthma history may lead to increased risk of childhood obesity."

In their prospective study, Dr. Chen and her colleagues analyzed the records of 2,171 kindergarteners and first graders who were not obese at the time they enrolled in the Southern California Children's Health Study (CHS). At enrollment, 13.5 percent of the children had asthma. The children were followed for up to 10 years (average: 6.9 years). During that time, 15.8 percent of all the children enrolled in the study developed obesity. Researchers confirmed study results in a different group of children, recruited in the 4th grade to participate in the CHS.

With treatment, most people with asthma are able to live normal lives. But there are some simple tips to help you keep your symptoms under control.

It's important to take any prescribed medication regularly, as this can help keep your symptoms under control and prevent severe asthma attacks.

It's also important to use any inhalers and spacers you may have been prescribed properly. Make sure your GP or practice nurse shows you how to use your inhalers correctly.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Symptoms of asthma are variable. That means that they can be mild to severe, intermittent to chronic. The one point to remember is that even when symptoms are mild, asthma should not be ignored. Untreated or under treated, asthma can lead to severe respiratory distress and in rare cases, sudden death. Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood affecting 12.5% of children.

There are two types of triggers : allergic and non-allergic. Triggers are things in your environment that cause the inflammation and afterwards, tightening of the airway muscles. Triggers are everywhere. Triggers can be allergic such as dust mites or non allergic such as exercise, viral infections, smoke or other irritants. It is important to identify both allergic and non-allergic triggers and develop avoidance/ control strategies. Only those with allergic asthma have symptoms triggered by allergens such a pet dander, pollen and dust mites. About 80-90% of people living with asthma have allergic triggers.

Asthma is often caused by an allergic reaction to foreign substances that affect the respiratory tract. When individuals who are allergic come into contact with an allergen to which they are sensitive, their immune system then responds by releasing several chemicals including histamines, causing sneezing, runny noses, watery eyes and broncho-constriction. This is the way the body attempts to expel the allergen/s. Histamines have several effects, one of which is to cause bronchial smooth muscles to contract which in turn, makes exhaling more difficult. In a child with asthma, histamine can also trigger asthma symptoms.

In "Effects of Childhood Asthma on the Development of Obesity among School-Aged Children," researchers report that young children with asthma were 51 percent more likely to become obese over the next decade as children who did not have asthma. The researchers also found that the use of asthma rescue medications reduced the risk of becoming obese by 43 percent.

"Asthma and obesity often occur together in children, but it is unclear whether children with asthma are at higher risk for onset of obesity or whether obese children develop asthma, or both, said Zhanghua Chen, PhD, lead study author and a postdoctoral research associate of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Our findings add to the literature that early-life asthma history may lead to increased risk of childhood obesity."

In their prospective study, Dr. Chen and her colleagues analyzed the records of 2,171 kindergarteners and first graders who were not obese at the time they enrolled in the Southern California Children's Health Study (CHS). At enrollment, 13.5 percent of the children had asthma. The children were followed for up to 10 years (average: 6.9 years). During that time, 15.8 percent of all the children enrolled in the study developed obesity. Researchers confirmed study results in a different group of children, recruited in the 4th grade to participate in the CHS.

In "Effects of Childhood Asthma on the Development of Obesity among School-Aged Children," researchers report that young children with asthma were 51 percent more likely to become obese over the next decade as children who did not have asthma. The researchers also found that the use of asthma rescue medications reduced the risk of becoming obese by 43 percent.

"Asthma and obesity often occur together in children, but it is unclear whether children with asthma are at higher risk for onset of obesity or whether obese children develop asthma, or both, said Zhanghua Chen, PhD, lead study author and a postdoctoral research associate of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Our findings add to the literature that early-life asthma history may lead to increased risk of childhood obesity."

In their prospective study, Dr. Chen and her colleagues analyzed the records of 2,171 kindergarteners and first graders who were not obese at the time they enrolled in the Southern California Children's Health Study (CHS). At enrollment, 13.5 percent of the children had asthma. The children were followed for up to 10 years (average: 6.9 years). During that time, 15.8 percent of all the children enrolled in the study developed obesity. Researchers confirmed study results in a different group of children, recruited in the 4th grade to participate in the CHS.

With treatment, most people with asthma are able to live normal lives. But there are some simple tips to help you keep your symptoms under control.

It's important to take any prescribed medication regularly, as this can help keep your symptoms under control and prevent severe asthma attacks.

It's also important to use any inhalers and spacers you may have been prescribed properly. Make sure your GP or practice nurse shows you how to use your inhalers correctly.

Asthma in Children | Asthma Symptoms | MedlinePlus


Asthma in Children & Infants: Symptoms and Treatments

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