This course looks at how over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries Europeans gave up one set of “others,” that is, social outsiders (witches, Jews and the poor) and during the Enlightenment replaced these with a new set of “others” (women, Africans and Asians). History 300 is a historical methods course, so this subject matter will be discussed with a view toward also giving students some basic introduction to how historians develop and debate historical theses.

T he word “princesses” feels a bit of misnomer. This exhibition’s title, with its note of youthful breathlessness, evokes an image of these hitherto little-regarded German royals as a trio of bright-eyed, elaborately coiffed young things as they might have been portrayed by one of the great painters of their time, such as Gainsborough or Reynolds.

In fact, these women, who married into the British monarchy and exerted – the show argues – a powerful influence on the Georgian period, belonged to different generations, and enjoyed their greatest prestige in middle age: Caroline, as the queen of George II; Augusta, who married his son, Frederick, remaining influential, despite his early death; while Charlotte, consort of the famously mad George III, effectively ruled the country for substantial periods.

T he period of these women’s eminence coincided not only with the Enlightenment, the rationalist revolution that swept Europe in the 18th century, but the period of Britain’s greatest political and industrial expansion. The exhibition brings together a fascinating array of artefacts – paintings, ceramics, clothes, personal effects – to examine the way their interests not only coincided with the tenor of this dynamic period, but – the exhibition maintains – actively influenced it, thereby creating the prototype for the “modern royal woman”, from Queen Victoria to Princess Diana and even the Duchess of Cornwall.  

Jason Goodwin is the author of the Yashim Ottoman detective series and “Lords of the Horizons: A History of the Ottoman Empire.”

This course looks at how over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries Europeans gave up one set of “others,” that is, social outsiders (witches, Jews and the poor) and during the Enlightenment replaced these with a new set of “others” (women, Africans and Asians). History 300 is a historical methods course, so this subject matter will be discussed with a view toward also giving students some basic introduction to how historians develop and debate historical theses.

T he word “princesses” feels a bit of misnomer. This exhibition’s title, with its note of youthful breathlessness, evokes an image of these hitherto little-regarded German royals as a trio of bright-eyed, elaborately coiffed young things as they might have been portrayed by one of the great painters of their time, such as Gainsborough or Reynolds.

In fact, these women, who married into the British monarchy and exerted – the show argues – a powerful influence on the Georgian period, belonged to different generations, and enjoyed their greatest prestige in middle age: Caroline, as the queen of George II; Augusta, who married his son, Frederick, remaining influential, despite his early death; while Charlotte, consort of the famously mad George III, effectively ruled the country for substantial periods.

T he period of these women’s eminence coincided not only with the Enlightenment, the rationalist revolution that swept Europe in the 18th century, but the period of Britain’s greatest political and industrial expansion. The exhibition brings together a fascinating array of artefacts – paintings, ceramics, clothes, personal effects – to examine the way their interests not only coincided with the tenor of this dynamic period, but – the exhibition maintains – actively influenced it, thereby creating the prototype for the “modern royal woman”, from Queen Victoria to Princess Diana and even the Duchess of Cornwall.  

Jason Goodwin is the author of the Yashim Ottoman detective series and “Lords of the Horizons: A History of the Ottoman Empire.”

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This course looks at how over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries Europeans gave up one set of “others,” that is, social outsiders (witches, Jews and the poor) and during the Enlightenment replaced these with a new set of “others” (women, Africans and Asians). History 300 is a historical methods course, so this subject matter will be discussed with a view toward also giving students some basic introduction to how historians develop and debate historical theses.

This course looks at how over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries Europeans gave up one set of “others,” that is, social outsiders (witches, Jews and the poor) and during the Enlightenment replaced these with a new set of “others” (women, Africans and Asians). History 300 is a historical methods course, so this subject matter will be discussed with a view toward also giving students some basic introduction to how historians develop and debate historical theses.

T he word “princesses” feels a bit of misnomer. This exhibition’s title, with its note of youthful breathlessness, evokes an image of these hitherto little-regarded German royals as a trio of bright-eyed, elaborately coiffed young things as they might have been portrayed by one of the great painters of their time, such as Gainsborough or Reynolds.

In fact, these women, who married into the British monarchy and exerted – the show argues – a powerful influence on the Georgian period, belonged to different generations, and enjoyed their greatest prestige in middle age: Caroline, as the queen of George II; Augusta, who married his son, Frederick, remaining influential, despite his early death; while Charlotte, consort of the famously mad George III, effectively ruled the country for substantial periods.

T he period of these women’s eminence coincided not only with the Enlightenment, the rationalist revolution that swept Europe in the 18th century, but the period of Britain’s greatest political and industrial expansion. The exhibition brings together a fascinating array of artefacts – paintings, ceramics, clothes, personal effects – to examine the way their interests not only coincided with the tenor of this dynamic period, but – the exhibition maintains – actively influenced it, thereby creating the prototype for the “modern royal woman”, from Queen Victoria to Princess Diana and even the Duchess of Cornwall.  

Amazon.com: The Birth of the Modern World, 1780 - 1914.


The Birth of the Modern: World Society 1815-1830 by Paul.

Posted by 2018 article

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