After the Buddha passed away, his teachings were compiled into a large collection of scripture called the Tipitaka, which is regarded as canonical by all Buddhists. 

The first precept of Buddhist ethics is to not kill any living creature.  The explanation goes beyond merely not harming, to being full of compassion for all beings (e.g. Brahmajala Sutta, Digha Nikaya 1.1.8).  This demonstrates how Buddhist ethics are not just concerned with how we treat other humans.  Humanity is always considered as embodied in our environmental context.

Like any cosmology, the historical details of this story should not be taken too literally. But these discourses present a remarkable understanding of humanity’s role in creating environmental problems, and our duty to help redress them.

In Buddhism, there are a vast number of Buddhist scriptures and religious texts, which are commonly divided into the categories of canonical and non-canonical.

The former, also called the Sutras (Sanskrit) or Suttas (Pali) are believed to be, either literally or metaphorically, the actual words of the Buddha. The latter are commentaries on canonical texts, other treatises on the Dharma, and collections of quotes, histories, grammars, etc.

This categorization is not universal, however: there will always be texts that cross boundaries, or that belong in more than one category. Moreover, Zen Buddhism rejects scriptures altogether as an ineffective path to enlightenment. The articles below provide overviews of some of the most notable Buddhist texts.

After the Buddha passed away, his teachings were compiled into a large collection of scripture called the Tipitaka, which is regarded as canonical by all Buddhists. 

The first precept of Buddhist ethics is to not kill any living creature.  The explanation goes beyond merely not harming, to being full of compassion for all beings (e.g. Brahmajala Sutta, Digha Nikaya 1.1.8).  This demonstrates how Buddhist ethics are not just concerned with how we treat other humans.  Humanity is always considered as embodied in our environmental context.

Like any cosmology, the historical details of this story should not be taken too literally. But these discourses present a remarkable understanding of humanity’s role in creating environmental problems, and our duty to help redress them.

In Buddhism, there are a vast number of Buddhist scriptures and religious texts, which are commonly divided into the categories of canonical and non-canonical.

The former, also called the Sutras (Sanskrit) or Suttas (Pali) are believed to be, either literally or metaphorically, the actual words of the Buddha. The latter are commentaries on canonical texts, other treatises on the Dharma, and collections of quotes, histories, grammars, etc.

This categorization is not universal, however: there will always be texts that cross boundaries, or that belong in more than one category. Moreover, Zen Buddhism rejects scriptures altogether as an ineffective path to enlightenment. The articles below provide overviews of some of the most notable Buddhist texts.

Buddhist texts were initially passed on orally by monks, but were later written down and composed as manuscripts in various Indo-Aryan languages which were ...

14.08.2017  · Learn about Buddhist scriptures , which comprise a variety of texts, but none are considered authoritative in all schools.

This section is an overview of the Buddhist Scriptures by Ven. Sayadaw U Sobhana, with an article on "Collecting the Tipitaka" which is the ...

After the Buddha passed away, his teachings were compiled into a large collection of scripture called the Tipitaka, which is regarded as canonical by all Buddhists. 

The first precept of Buddhist ethics is to not kill any living creature.  The explanation goes beyond merely not harming, to being full of compassion for all beings (e.g. Brahmajala Sutta, Digha Nikaya 1.1.8).  This demonstrates how Buddhist ethics are not just concerned with how we treat other humans.  Humanity is always considered as embodied in our environmental context.

Like any cosmology, the historical details of this story should not be taken too literally. But these discourses present a remarkable understanding of humanity’s role in creating environmental problems, and our duty to help redress them.

Buddhist Studies: Texts of Buddhist Scriptures


Understanding Buddhist Scriptures - ThoughtCo

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