J ust before Christmas, Science magazine published " an update of Wallace's zoogeographic regions of the world ". The headline presumes immediate recognition by surname alone and it implies that the observations of a lone Victorian traveller and a self-taught naturalist were sufficiently sound to survive as standard biology for more than a century.

Five generations of increasingly professional taxonomists, geneticists, systematists, ecologists, ornithologists, zoologists, ichthyologists and botanists – the most recent equipped with electron microscopes, DNA sequencing technology and satellite observation – tested his findings again and again. The Science team report that their own classification of vertebrate assemblages "exhibits some interesting similarities with Wallace's original classification, as well as some important differences". Consider it not a correction but a salute.

This will be a year of salutes to Alfred Russel Wallace , who died 100 years ago this coming November. To understand why he was such an extraordinary figure, just read The Malay Archipelago: The Land of the Orang-Utan and the Bird of Paradise, a Narrative of Travel with Studies of Man and Nature. He is an adventurer who does not present himself as adventurous; he is a Victorian Englishman abroad with all the self-assurance but without the lordly superiority of the coloniser; he is the chronicler of wonders who refuses to exaggerate, or to believe anybody else's improbable marvels: what he can see and examine (and, very often, shoot) is wonder enough for him.

The Malay Archipelago is a book by the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace which chronicles his scientific exploration, during the eight-year period 1854 to 1862, of the southern portion of the Malay Archipelago including Malaysia , Singapore , the islands of Indonesia , then known as the Dutch East Indies , and the island of New Guinea . It was published in two volumes in 1869, delayed by Wallace's ill health and the work needed to describe the many specimens he brought home, the book went through ten editions in the nineteenth century; it has been reprinted many times since, and has been translated into at least eight languages.

The book describes each island that he visited in turn, giving a detailed account of its physical and human geography , its volcanoes , and the variety of animals and plants that he found and collected. At the same time, he describes his experiences, the difficulties of travel, and the help he received from the different peoples that he met, the preface notes that he travelled over 14,000 miles and collected 125,660 natural history specimens, mostly of insects though also thousands of molluscs , birds , mammals and reptiles .

The work was illustrated with engravings, based on Wallace's observations and collection, by the leading illustrators Thomas Baines , Walter Hood Fitch , John Gerrard Keulemans , E. W. Robinson , Joseph Wolf and T. W. Wood .

It has also been called the East Indies , the Indo-Australian Archipelago, Indonesian Archipelago and other names over time.

The archipelago is between the Indian and Pacific Oceans . The group has over 25,000 islands . It is the largest archipelago by area, and third by number of islands in the world . It includes Indonesia , the Philippines , Singapore , Brunei , East Malaysia and East Timor . [4]

The island of New Guinea or islands of Papua New Guinea are not always included in definitions of the Malay Archipelago. [4] [5] The Indonesian Moluccas are included in the archipelago.

J ust before Christmas, Science magazine published " an update of Wallace's zoogeographic regions of the world ". The headline presumes immediate recognition by surname alone and it implies that the observations of a lone Victorian traveller and a self-taught naturalist were sufficiently sound to survive as standard biology for more than a century.

Five generations of increasingly professional taxonomists, geneticists, systematists, ecologists, ornithologists, zoologists, ichthyologists and botanists – the most recent equipped with electron microscopes, DNA sequencing technology and satellite observation – tested his findings again and again. The Science team report that their own classification of vertebrate assemblages "exhibits some interesting similarities with Wallace's original classification, as well as some important differences". Consider it not a correction but a salute.

This will be a year of salutes to Alfred Russel Wallace , who died 100 years ago this coming November. To understand why he was such an extraordinary figure, just read The Malay Archipelago: The Land of the Orang-Utan and the Bird of Paradise, a Narrative of Travel with Studies of Man and Nature. He is an adventurer who does not present himself as adventurous; he is a Victorian Englishman abroad with all the self-assurance but without the lordly superiority of the coloniser; he is the chronicler of wonders who refuses to exaggerate, or to believe anybody else's improbable marvels: what he can see and examine (and, very often, shoot) is wonder enough for him.

The Malay Archipelago is a book by the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace which chronicles his scientific exploration, during the eight-year period 1854 to 1862, of the southern portion of the Malay Archipelago including Malaysia , Singapore , the islands of Indonesia , then known as the Dutch East Indies , and the island of New Guinea . It was published in two volumes in 1869, delayed by Wallace's ill health and the work needed to describe the many specimens he brought home, the book went through ten editions in the nineteenth century; it has been reprinted many times since, and has been translated into at least eight languages.

The book describes each island that he visited in turn, giving a detailed account of its physical and human geography , its volcanoes , and the variety of animals and plants that he found and collected. At the same time, he describes his experiences, the difficulties of travel, and the help he received from the different peoples that he met, the preface notes that he travelled over 14,000 miles and collected 125,660 natural history specimens, mostly of insects though also thousands of molluscs , birds , mammals and reptiles .

The work was illustrated with engravings, based on Wallace's observations and collection, by the leading illustrators Thomas Baines , Walter Hood Fitch , John Gerrard Keulemans , E. W. Robinson , Joseph Wolf and T. W. Wood .

J ust before Christmas, Science magazine published " an update of Wallace's zoogeographic regions of the world ". The headline presumes immediate recognition by surname alone and it implies that the observations of a lone Victorian traveller and a self-taught naturalist were sufficiently sound to survive as standard biology for more than a century.

Five generations of increasingly professional taxonomists, geneticists, systematists, ecologists, ornithologists, zoologists, ichthyologists and botanists – the most recent equipped with electron microscopes, DNA sequencing technology and satellite observation – tested his findings again and again. The Science team report that their own classification of vertebrate assemblages "exhibits some interesting similarities with Wallace's original classification, as well as some important differences". Consider it not a correction but a salute.

This will be a year of salutes to Alfred Russel Wallace , who died 100 years ago this coming November. To understand why he was such an extraordinary figure, just read The Malay Archipelago: The Land of the Orang-Utan and the Bird of Paradise, a Narrative of Travel with Studies of Man and Nature. He is an adventurer who does not present himself as adventurous; he is a Victorian Englishman abroad with all the self-assurance but without the lordly superiority of the coloniser; he is the chronicler of wonders who refuses to exaggerate, or to believe anybody else's improbable marvels: what he can see and examine (and, very often, shoot) is wonder enough for him.

The Malay Archipelago is a book by the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace which chronicles his scientific exploration, during the eight-year period 1854 to 1862, of the southern portion of the Malay Archipelago including Malaysia , Singapore , the islands of Indonesia , then known as the Dutch East Indies , and the island of New Guinea . It was published in two volumes in 1869, delayed by Wallace's ill health and the work needed to describe the many specimens he brought home, the book went through ten editions in the nineteenth century; it has been reprinted many times since, and has been translated into at least eight languages.

The book describes each island that he visited in turn, giving a detailed account of its physical and human geography , its volcanoes , and the variety of animals and plants that he found and collected. At the same time, he describes his experiences, the difficulties of travel, and the help he received from the different peoples that he met, the preface notes that he travelled over 14,000 miles and collected 125,660 natural history specimens, mostly of insects though also thousands of molluscs , birds , mammals and reptiles .

The work was illustrated with engravings, based on Wallace's observations and collection, by the leading illustrators Thomas Baines , Walter Hood Fitch , John Gerrard Keulemans , E. W. Robinson , Joseph Wolf and T. W. Wood .

It has also been called the East Indies , the Indo-Australian Archipelago, Indonesian Archipelago and other names over time.

The archipelago is between the Indian and Pacific Oceans . The group has over 25,000 islands . It is the largest archipelago by area, and third by number of islands in the world . It includes Indonesia , the Philippines , Singapore , Brunei , East Malaysia and East Timor . [4]

The island of New Guinea or islands of Papua New Guinea are not always included in definitions of the Malay Archipelago. [4] [5] The Indonesian Moluccas are included in the archipelago.

My readers will naturally ask why I have delayed writing this book for six years after my return; and I feel bound to give them full satisfaction on this point.

When I reached England in the spring of 1862, I found myself surrounded by a room full of packing cases containing the collections that I had, from time to time, sent home for my private use. These comprised nearly three thousand birdskins of about one thousand species, at least twenty thousand beetles and butterflies of about seven thousand species, and some quadrupeds and land shells besides. A large proportion of these I had not seen for years, and in my then weakened state of health, the unpacking, sorting, and arranging of such a mass of specimens occupied a long time.

I very soon decided that until I had done something towards naming and describing the most important groups in my collection, and had worked out some of the more interesting problems of variation and geographical distribution (of which I had had glimpses while collecting them), I would not attempt to publish my travels. Indeed, I could have printed my notes and journals at once, leaving all reference to questions of natural history for a future work; but, I felt that this would be as unsatisfactory to myself as it would be disappointing to my friends, and uninstructive to the public.

J ust before Christmas, Science magazine published " an update of Wallace's zoogeographic regions of the world ". The headline presumes immediate recognition by surname alone and it implies that the observations of a lone Victorian traveller and a self-taught naturalist were sufficiently sound to survive as standard biology for more than a century.

Five generations of increasingly professional taxonomists, geneticists, systematists, ecologists, ornithologists, zoologists, ichthyologists and botanists – the most recent equipped with electron microscopes, DNA sequencing technology and satellite observation – tested his findings again and again. The Science team report that their own classification of vertebrate assemblages "exhibits some interesting similarities with Wallace's original classification, as well as some important differences". Consider it not a correction but a salute.

This will be a year of salutes to Alfred Russel Wallace , who died 100 years ago this coming November. To understand why he was such an extraordinary figure, just read The Malay Archipelago: The Land of the Orang-Utan and the Bird of Paradise, a Narrative of Travel with Studies of Man and Nature. He is an adventurer who does not present himself as adventurous; he is a Victorian Englishman abroad with all the self-assurance but without the lordly superiority of the coloniser; he is the chronicler of wonders who refuses to exaggerate, or to believe anybody else's improbable marvels: what he can see and examine (and, very often, shoot) is wonder enough for him.

Malay Archipelago | islands, southeast Asia | Britannica.com


The Malay Archipelago - Wikipedia

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