Greek : tou s de bebelous kai graodeis muthous paraitou. ( 2SPMM ) gumnaze ( 2SPAM ) de seauton pros eusebeian;

Amplified : But refuse and avoid irreverent legends (profane and impure and godless fictions, mere grandmothers’ tales) and silly myths, and express your disapproval of them. Train yourself toward godliness (piety), [keeping yourself spiritually fit]. ( Amplified Bible - Lockman )

NLT : Do not waste time arguing over godless ideas and old wives' tales. Spend your time and energy in training yourself for spiritual fitness. ( NLT - Tyndale House )

I often come across what I suspect to be slug eggs when digging or planting or just moving things from one spot to another. Today is the first time that I’ve found eggs I could identify without doubt as the nascent slugs were visible curled in their translucent beds, these tiny eggs of a transparent beauty to rival the wildflowers of early spring.

Slugs inhabit a no-man’s land of disquieting sliminess, small and harmless but unloved. Why is it, I wonder, that snails are beloved, cute, pictured on greeting cards and in children’s books, while slugs are so reviled? When I had a bed of strawberries I reviled them both equally, despoilers of my food; they would nibble the first bit of the berry that turned red, then eat it from the inside. I’d smash them and slice them and drown them willy-nilly, a fierce if futile war between farmer (such as I was) and pest. But now I have no competition with the slugs, so I mostly leave them alone and I’m able to simply appreciate the beauty of these tiny jewels enclosing tiny bits of life.

I can’t say that I know what all of these flowers are, and I’m posting this without labeling even those that I do, but it’s fun for me to see how many of them I do know. (Sorry that a few aren’t photographed in a way to facilitate identification, if you are taking a stab at it yourself.)

Greek : tou s de bebelous kai graodeis muthous paraitou. ( 2SPMM ) gumnaze ( 2SPAM ) de seauton pros eusebeian;

Amplified : But refuse and avoid irreverent legends (profane and impure and godless fictions, mere grandmothers’ tales) and silly myths, and express your disapproval of them. Train yourself toward godliness (piety), [keeping yourself spiritually fit]. ( Amplified Bible - Lockman )

NLT : Do not waste time arguing over godless ideas and old wives' tales. Spend your time and energy in training yourself for spiritual fitness. ( NLT - Tyndale House )

Greek : tou s de bebelous kai graodeis muthous paraitou. ( 2SPMM ) gumnaze ( 2SPAM ) de seauton pros eusebeian;

Amplified : But refuse and avoid irreverent legends (profane and impure and godless fictions, mere grandmothers’ tales) and silly myths, and express your disapproval of them. Train yourself toward godliness (piety), [keeping yourself spiritually fit]. ( Amplified Bible - Lockman )

NLT : Do not waste time arguing over godless ideas and old wives' tales. Spend your time and energy in training yourself for spiritual fitness. ( NLT - Tyndale House )

I often come across what I suspect to be slug eggs when digging or planting or just moving things from one spot to another. Today is the first time that I’ve found eggs I could identify without doubt as the nascent slugs were visible curled in their translucent beds, these tiny eggs of a transparent beauty to rival the wildflowers of early spring.

Slugs inhabit a no-man’s land of disquieting sliminess, small and harmless but unloved. Why is it, I wonder, that snails are beloved, cute, pictured on greeting cards and in children’s books, while slugs are so reviled? When I had a bed of strawberries I reviled them both equally, despoilers of my food; they would nibble the first bit of the berry that turned red, then eat it from the inside. I’d smash them and slice them and drown them willy-nilly, a fierce if futile war between farmer (such as I was) and pest. But now I have no competition with the slugs, so I mostly leave them alone and I’m able to simply appreciate the beauty of these tiny jewels enclosing tiny bits of life.

I can’t say that I know what all of these flowers are, and I’m posting this without labeling even those that I do, but it’s fun for me to see how many of them I do know. (Sorry that a few aren’t photographed in a way to facilitate identification, if you are taking a stab at it yourself.)

This edition of the Charlotte Mason Series, typed by AmblesideOnline volunteers, is copyrighted to AmblesideOnline, and may not be published or re-posted elsewhere. Please refer to our License for more information.

This is how the late Mrs. Francis Steinthal, who was the happy instigator of the movement in Council Schools, wrote,––"Think of the meaning of this in the lives of the children,––disciplined lives, and no lawless strikes, justice, an end to class warfare, developed intellects, and

no market for trashy and corrupt literature! We shall, or rather they will, live in a redeemed world." This was written in a moment of enthusiasm on hearing that a certain County Council had accepted a scheme of work for this pioneer school; enthusiasm sees in advance the fields white to the harvest, but indeed the event is likely to justify high expectations. Though less than nine years have passed since that pioneer school made the bold attempt, already many thousands of children working under numerous County Councils are finding that "Studies serve for delight."

Greek : tou s de bebelous kai graodeis muthous paraitou. ( 2SPMM ) gumnaze ( 2SPAM ) de seauton pros eusebeian;

Amplified : But refuse and avoid irreverent legends (profane and impure and godless fictions, mere grandmothers’ tales) and silly myths, and express your disapproval of them. Train yourself toward godliness (piety), [keeping yourself spiritually fit]. ( Amplified Bible - Lockman )

NLT : Do not waste time arguing over godless ideas and old wives' tales. Spend your time and energy in training yourself for spiritual fitness. ( NLT - Tyndale House )

I often come across what I suspect to be slug eggs when digging or planting or just moving things from one spot to another. Today is the first time that I’ve found eggs I could identify without doubt as the nascent slugs were visible curled in their translucent beds, these tiny eggs of a transparent beauty to rival the wildflowers of early spring.

Slugs inhabit a no-man’s land of disquieting sliminess, small and harmless but unloved. Why is it, I wonder, that snails are beloved, cute, pictured on greeting cards and in children’s books, while slugs are so reviled? When I had a bed of strawberries I reviled them both equally, despoilers of my food; they would nibble the first bit of the berry that turned red, then eat it from the inside. I’d smash them and slice them and drown them willy-nilly, a fierce if futile war between farmer (such as I was) and pest. But now I have no competition with the slugs, so I mostly leave them alone and I’m able to simply appreciate the beauty of these tiny jewels enclosing tiny bits of life.

I can’t say that I know what all of these flowers are, and I’m posting this without labeling even those that I do, but it’s fun for me to see how many of them I do know. (Sorry that a few aren’t photographed in a way to facilitate identification, if you are taking a stab at it yourself.)

This edition of the Charlotte Mason Series, typed by AmblesideOnline volunteers, is copyrighted to AmblesideOnline, and may not be published or re-posted elsewhere. Please refer to our License for more information.

This is how the late Mrs. Francis Steinthal, who was the happy instigator of the movement in Council Schools, wrote,––"Think of the meaning of this in the lives of the children,––disciplined lives, and no lawless strikes, justice, an end to class warfare, developed intellects, and

no market for trashy and corrupt literature! We shall, or rather they will, live in a redeemed world." This was written in a moment of enthusiasm on hearing that a certain County Council had accepted a scheme of work for this pioneer school; enthusiasm sees in advance the fields white to the harvest, but indeed the event is likely to justify high expectations. Though less than nine years have passed since that pioneer school made the bold attempt, already many thousands of children working under numerous County Councils are finding that "Studies serve for delight."

Fable, parable, and allegory , any form of imaginative literature or spoken utterance constructed in such a way that readers or listeners are encouraged to look for meanings hidden beneath the literal surface of the fiction. A story is told or perhaps enacted whose details—when interpreted—are found to correspond to the details of some other system of relations (its hidden, allegorical sense). The poet, for example, may describe the ascent of a hill in such a way that each physical step corresponds to a new stage in the soul’s progress toward a higher level of existence.

Many forms of literature elicit this kind of searching interpretation, and the generic term for the cluster is allegory; under it may be grouped fables, parables, and other symbolic shapings. Allegory may involve either a creative or an interpretive process: either the act of building up the allegorical structure and giving “body” to the surface narrative or the act of breaking down this structure to see what themes or ideas run parallel to it.

Fable and parable are short, simple forms of naive allegory. The fable is usually a tale about animals who are personified and behave as though they were humans ( see photograph ). The device of personification is also extended to trees , winds, streams, stones, and other natural objects. The earliest of these tales also included humans and gods as characters, but fable tends to concentrate on animating the inanimate. A feature that isolates fable from the ordinary folktale, which it resembles, is that a moral —a rule of behaviour—is woven into the story.

This is a complete bibliography of the classical text translations quoted on the biography pages of Theoi.com The passages quoted have been modified slightly for this website with the conversion of names to their transliterated Greek forms--sourced from the original Greek text--and the addition of bracketed contextual notes.

Most of the volumes listed below are available for purchase on Amazon.com. Click on the book image or name to view price and current availability.

N.B. Collating references to myth from classical literature is an ongoing task for the Theoi Project. The books listed below have, for the most part, been thoroughly sourced. Other important texts which I have not yet collated quotes from are listed separately at the bottom of the page.

Greek : tou s de bebelous kai graodeis muthous paraitou. ( 2SPMM ) gumnaze ( 2SPAM ) de seauton pros eusebeian;

Amplified : But refuse and avoid irreverent legends (profane and impure and godless fictions, mere grandmothers’ tales) and silly myths, and express your disapproval of them. Train yourself toward godliness (piety), [keeping yourself spiritually fit]. ( Amplified Bible - Lockman )

NLT : Do not waste time arguing over godless ideas and old wives' tales. Spend your time and energy in training yourself for spiritual fitness. ( NLT - Tyndale House )

I often come across what I suspect to be slug eggs when digging or planting or just moving things from one spot to another. Today is the first time that I’ve found eggs I could identify without doubt as the nascent slugs were visible curled in their translucent beds, these tiny eggs of a transparent beauty to rival the wildflowers of early spring.

Slugs inhabit a no-man’s land of disquieting sliminess, small and harmless but unloved. Why is it, I wonder, that snails are beloved, cute, pictured on greeting cards and in children’s books, while slugs are so reviled? When I had a bed of strawberries I reviled them both equally, despoilers of my food; they would nibble the first bit of the berry that turned red, then eat it from the inside. I’d smash them and slice them and drown them willy-nilly, a fierce if futile war between farmer (such as I was) and pest. But now I have no competition with the slugs, so I mostly leave them alone and I’m able to simply appreciate the beauty of these tiny jewels enclosing tiny bits of life.

I can’t say that I know what all of these flowers are, and I’m posting this without labeling even those that I do, but it’s fun for me to see how many of them I do know. (Sorry that a few aren’t photographed in a way to facilitate identification, if you are taking a stab at it yourself.)

This edition of the Charlotte Mason Series, typed by AmblesideOnline volunteers, is copyrighted to AmblesideOnline, and may not be published or re-posted elsewhere. Please refer to our License for more information.

This is how the late Mrs. Francis Steinthal, who was the happy instigator of the movement in Council Schools, wrote,––"Think of the meaning of this in the lives of the children,––disciplined lives, and no lawless strikes, justice, an end to class warfare, developed intellects, and

no market for trashy and corrupt literature! We shall, or rather they will, live in a redeemed world." This was written in a moment of enthusiasm on hearing that a certain County Council had accepted a scheme of work for this pioneer school; enthusiasm sees in advance the fields white to the harvest, but indeed the event is likely to justify high expectations. Though less than nine years have passed since that pioneer school made the bold attempt, already many thousands of children working under numerous County Councils are finding that "Studies serve for delight."

Fable, parable, and allegory , any form of imaginative literature or spoken utterance constructed in such a way that readers or listeners are encouraged to look for meanings hidden beneath the literal surface of the fiction. A story is told or perhaps enacted whose details—when interpreted—are found to correspond to the details of some other system of relations (its hidden, allegorical sense). The poet, for example, may describe the ascent of a hill in such a way that each physical step corresponds to a new stage in the soul’s progress toward a higher level of existence.

Many forms of literature elicit this kind of searching interpretation, and the generic term for the cluster is allegory; under it may be grouped fables, parables, and other symbolic shapings. Allegory may involve either a creative or an interpretive process: either the act of building up the allegorical structure and giving “body” to the surface narrative or the act of breaking down this structure to see what themes or ideas run parallel to it.

Fable and parable are short, simple forms of naive allegory. The fable is usually a tale about animals who are personified and behave as though they were humans ( see photograph ). The device of personification is also extended to trees , winds, streams, stones, and other natural objects. The earliest of these tales also included humans and gods as characters, but fable tends to concentrate on animating the inanimate. A feature that isolates fable from the ordinary folktale, which it resembles, is that a moral —a rule of behaviour—is woven into the story.

antique | kimonsbooks


Aesop s Fables: Aesop, Arthur Rackham, V. S. Vernon Jones.

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