Harmonious words render ordinary ideas acceptable; less ordinary, pleasant; novel and ingenious ones, delightful. As pictures and statues, and living beauty, too, show better by music-light, so is poetry irradiated, vivified, glorified', and raised into immortal life by harmony.

I strove with none, for none was worth my strife. Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end.

The English poet, essayist, and critic Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864) is best known for his "Imaginary Conversations," a series of dialogues between historical personages.

Walter Savage Landor was born on Jan. 30, 1775, the eldest son of Walter Landor, a doctor, and Elizabeth Savage Landor, an heiress whose fortune of £80,000 was entailed on her eldest son, though she had three more. Dr. Landor owned Hughenden Manor, later bought by Benjamin Disraeli. Walter Savage was sent away to school at 4 and at 9 went to Rugby School. He loved all nature: he did not pick flowers, pulled boys' ears for stoning rooks, never took a bird's nest, and never hunted. By 1789 he was writing bawdy verses and vociferously approving the French Revolution.

In 1793 Landor went to Trinity College, Oxford, where he was thought a "mad Jacobin" because he wore unpowdered hair. He was sent down in 1794 for shooting a fellow student and spent a summer at Tenby in Wales, where he made love to a woman named Nancy Jones, later "banging angrily" out of his father's house to live with her at Swansea until the birth of their child. His father allowed him only £150 a year, and he went home when that was spent. In 1796 on the Welsh coast, he met and fell in love with Rose Aylmer, aged 17, and wrote poetry for her; she died in 1800 in India. In 1803 he published "Gebir," an Oriental story written in blank verse.

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Paynter, afterwards Lady Graves-Sawle, a niece of Rose Aylmer. The interchange continued after his retreat to Italy in 1858.

'Poetry was always my amusement', Landor declared, 'prose my study and business'; and it was to Imaginary Conversations that he looked for fame, as he went on to prophesy 'I shall dine late; but the dining-room will be well lighted, the guests few and select'. It may be proper then to take the prose before the verse, considering not only the Conversations but Pericles and Aspasia and The Pentameron .

It is altogether in keeping with Landor's character -- his pride, his courtesy, his feeling for classical form -- that, although his prose runs easily, ceremony should be a constant feature of his writing, and seldom absent for long. The ceremonious style came naturally to him, and to see how easily it can rise from a humble context we may look at . .

Harmonious words render ordinary ideas acceptable; less ordinary, pleasant; novel and ingenious ones, delightful. As pictures and statues, and living beauty, too, show better by music-light, so is poetry irradiated, vivified, glorified', and raised into immortal life by harmony.

I strove with none, for none was worth my strife. Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end.

The English poet, essayist, and critic Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864) is best known for his "Imaginary Conversations," a series of dialogues between historical personages.

Walter Savage Landor was born on Jan. 30, 1775, the eldest son of Walter Landor, a doctor, and Elizabeth Savage Landor, an heiress whose fortune of £80,000 was entailed on her eldest son, though she had three more. Dr. Landor owned Hughenden Manor, later bought by Benjamin Disraeli. Walter Savage was sent away to school at 4 and at 9 went to Rugby School. He loved all nature: he did not pick flowers, pulled boys' ears for stoning rooks, never took a bird's nest, and never hunted. By 1789 he was writing bawdy verses and vociferously approving the French Revolution.

In 1793 Landor went to Trinity College, Oxford, where he was thought a "mad Jacobin" because he wore unpowdered hair. He was sent down in 1794 for shooting a fellow student and spent a summer at Tenby in Wales, where he made love to a woman named Nancy Jones, later "banging angrily" out of his father's house to live with her at Swansea until the birth of their child. His father allowed him only £150 a year, and he went home when that was spent. In 1796 on the Welsh coast, he met and fell in love with Rose Aylmer, aged 17, and wrote poetry for her; she died in 1800 in India. In 1803 he published "Gebir," an Oriental story written in blank verse.

Thank you for fulfilling this photo request. An email has been sent to the person who requested the photo informing them that you have fulfilled their request

All photos appear on this tab and here you can update the sort order of photos on memorials you manage. To view a photo in more detail or edit captions for photos you added, click the photo to open the photo viewer.

Flowers added to the memorial appear on the bottom of the memorial or here on the Flowers tab. To add a flower, click the “Leave a Flower” button.

Harmonious words render ordinary ideas acceptable; less ordinary, pleasant; novel and ingenious ones, delightful. As pictures and statues, and living beauty, too, show better by music-light, so is poetry irradiated, vivified, glorified', and raised into immortal life by harmony.

I strove with none, for none was worth my strife. Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end.

The English poet, essayist, and critic Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864) is best known for his "Imaginary Conversations," a series of dialogues between historical personages.

Walter Savage Landor was born on Jan. 30, 1775, the eldest son of Walter Landor, a doctor, and Elizabeth Savage Landor, an heiress whose fortune of £80,000 was entailed on her eldest son, though she had three more. Dr. Landor owned Hughenden Manor, later bought by Benjamin Disraeli. Walter Savage was sent away to school at 4 and at 9 went to Rugby School. He loved all nature: he did not pick flowers, pulled boys' ears for stoning rooks, never took a bird's nest, and never hunted. By 1789 he was writing bawdy verses and vociferously approving the French Revolution.

In 1793 Landor went to Trinity College, Oxford, where he was thought a "mad Jacobin" because he wore unpowdered hair. He was sent down in 1794 for shooting a fellow student and spent a summer at Tenby in Wales, where he made love to a woman named Nancy Jones, later "banging angrily" out of his father's house to live with her at Swansea until the birth of their child. His father allowed him only £150 a year, and he went home when that was spent. In 1796 on the Welsh coast, he met and fell in love with Rose Aylmer, aged 17, and wrote poetry for her; she died in 1800 in India. In 1803 he published "Gebir," an Oriental story written in blank verse.

Harmonious words render ordinary ideas acceptable; less ordinary, pleasant; novel and ingenious ones, delightful. As pictures and statues, and living beauty, too, show better by music-light, so is poetry irradiated, vivified, glorified', and raised into immortal life by harmony.

I strove with none, for none was worth my strife. Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end.

Harmonious words render ordinary ideas acceptable; less ordinary, pleasant; novel and ingenious ones, delightful. As pictures and statues, and living beauty, too, show better by music-light, so is poetry irradiated, vivified, glorified', and raised into immortal life by harmony.

I strove with none, for none was worth my strife. Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end.

The English poet, essayist, and critic Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864) is best known for his "Imaginary Conversations," a series of dialogues between historical personages.

Walter Savage Landor was born on Jan. 30, 1775, the eldest son of Walter Landor, a doctor, and Elizabeth Savage Landor, an heiress whose fortune of £80,000 was entailed on her eldest son, though she had three more. Dr. Landor owned Hughenden Manor, later bought by Benjamin Disraeli. Walter Savage was sent away to school at 4 and at 9 went to Rugby School. He loved all nature: he did not pick flowers, pulled boys' ears for stoning rooks, never took a bird's nest, and never hunted. By 1789 he was writing bawdy verses and vociferously approving the French Revolution.

In 1793 Landor went to Trinity College, Oxford, where he was thought a "mad Jacobin" because he wore unpowdered hair. He was sent down in 1794 for shooting a fellow student and spent a summer at Tenby in Wales, where he made love to a woman named Nancy Jones, later "banging angrily" out of his father's house to live with her at Swansea until the birth of their child. His father allowed him only £150 a year, and he went home when that was spent. In 1796 on the Welsh coast, he met and fell in love with Rose Aylmer, aged 17, and wrote poetry for her; she died in 1800 in India. In 1803 he published "Gebir," an Oriental story written in blank verse.

Thank you for fulfilling this photo request. An email has been sent to the person who requested the photo informing them that you have fulfilled their request

All photos appear on this tab and here you can update the sort order of photos on memorials you manage. To view a photo in more detail or edit captions for photos you added, click the photo to open the photo viewer.

Flowers added to the memorial appear on the bottom of the memorial or here on the Flowers tab. To add a flower, click the “Leave a Flower” button.

Paynter, afterwards Lady Graves-Sawle, a niece of Rose Aylmer. The interchange continued after his retreat to Italy in 1858.

'Poetry was always my amusement', Landor declared, 'prose my study and business'; and it was to Imaginary Conversations that he looked for fame, as he went on to prophesy 'I shall dine late; but the dining-room will be well lighted, the guests few and select'. It may be proper then to take the prose before the verse, considering not only the Conversations but Pericles and Aspasia and The Pentameron .

It is altogether in keeping with Landor's character -- his pride, his courtesy, his feeling for classical form -- that, although his prose runs easily, ceremony should be a constant feature of his writing, and seldom absent for long. The ceremonious style came naturally to him, and to see how easily it can rise from a humble context we may look at . .

Landor's best known works were the prose Imaginary Conversations, and the poem "Rose Aylmer," but the critical acclaim he received from contemporary poets and reviewers was not matched by public popularity. As remarkable as his work was, it was equaled by his rumbustious character and lively temperament.

Landor was born in Warwick , England , the eldest son of Dr. Walter Landor, a physician, and his 2nd wife, Elizabeth (Savage). His birth-place, Eastgate House, is now occupied by The King's High School For Girls. His father inherited estates at Rugeley , Staffordshire and his mother was heiress to estates at Ipsley Court and Tachbrook in Warwickshire . Landor as the eldest son was heir to these properties and looked forward to a life of prosperity. The family tradition was Whig in reaction to George III and Pitt , and although Landor's brother Robert was the only other member to achieve fame as a writer there was a strong literary tradition in the family.

Landor settled in South Wales, returning home to Warwick for short visits. It was at Swansea that he became friendly with the family of Lord Aylmer , including his sister, Rose, whom Landor later immortalized in the poem, "Rose Aylmer" . It was she who lent him "The Progress of Romance" by Gothic authoress Clara Reeve; in this he found the story "The History of Charoba, Queen of Egypt" , which inspired his poem "Gebir" . Rose Aylmer sailed to India with an aunt in 1798, and 2 years later died of Cholera.

Walter Savage Landor | Poetry Foundation


Walter Savage Landor Poems - PoemHunter.Com

Posted by 2018 article

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