Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

The Bantam Books Doc Savage Series : Bantam Books reprinted all of the Doc Savage novels and then some. Following is an index to the novels in the order Bantam published them. Title changes and notes are enclosed by brackets.

Beginning with reprint #127, Bantam began collecting multiple novels in single omnibus volumes, and numbering by volume rather than title.


NOTE: A movie edition of The Man of Bronze, completely retypeset, with 8 pages of stills and a full color painting of Ron Ely as Doc on the back cover, was released in June, 1975, as a tie-in with the George Pal production, Doc Savage, The Man of Bronze. It was the 8th, and probably the most recent, printing. However, a Scholastic Book Club version of the same edition lists that as the 12th printing. Evidently, the book had numerous Scholastic printings, which are identical to the Bantam editions except for the lack of Bantam cover and spine logos, book numbers and printed price. The best-selling Doc Savage reprint is Brand of the Werewolf which sold over 185,000 copies!

Known for his art, J. G. Jones takes over the writing duties of “Doc Savage” with this month’s issue and his adoration of the character and his roots show through. After an involved story arc that was both personally motivating for Doc Savage and allowed a broader view of the “First Wave” world, Jones goes for a more basic adventure approach. It’s globetrotting and mummies for Doc and company, but that feels empty and without purpose. Things happen and characters move along their set path and there’s no reason to care except for it happening in “Doc Savage” #13 and that’s not a good enough reason.

There’s something comedic almost about Jones’s first big stab at writing featuring such grotesque, flat, ugly art. Qing Ping Mui’s style is one of incomprehensible perspectives and distorted heads with the idea that more lines mean more detail and stronger compositions. There’s a sheer incompetency in the way that he draws figures with child-like faces and heads that look like they were pressed on the page, and flattened, stretching them out in the process. More than that, every character features the same body, nothing setting Doc Savage, for example, apart from anyone else besides his haircut and extra-babyish face.

In a superficial manner, Jones’s writing adheres to the Doc Savage pulps with an adventure that spans the globe, a mummy to fight, and an evil group to stop. But, all that’s there is surface. Doc Savage isn’t so much a character as a human-like figure that goes through the intended motions of the plot. First, he fights the mummy and, then, he goes here, never expressing any thought except to advance the plot in the most direct fashion.

Years later, with the advent of inexpensive home computers you check your work. You decide that you were pretty close. Not bad for a bored 15 year-old.

What had you found? Well, the most used word is the . This isn’t a big suprise since most books started with the . How many? 119 with 13 serving their place in the middle of titles.

As a matter of fact, there are 599 total words in the Doc Savage titles (counting hypenated words as 1 each, of course) and 37 words occur at least 3 times. Still with me? After “the” the (are you trying to say this out loud?) next most used word is of (26). That’s no suprise, but it’s followed by Death (13), Terror (12), and some form of Devil (11). The others used 5 or more times are: Man (9), Men (6), Black (6), in (6), Island or Isle (6), Fear (5), and Mystery (5).

Doc Savage Omnibus #13 has 25 ratings and 1 review. Craig said: The first Doc Savage story appeared in 1933 and the series ran in pulp and later digest f...

DOC SAVAGE OMNIBUS #13 Sep 1, 1990. by Kenneth Robeson. Mass Market Paperback. $54.00 (24 used & new offers) 5 out of 5 stars 2. DOC SAVAGE OMNIBUS 6 …

Doc Savage is a fictional character originally published in American pulp magazines during the 1930s and 1940s. He was created by publisher Henry W. Ralston and ...

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

The Bantam Books Doc Savage Series : Bantam Books reprinted all of the Doc Savage novels and then some. Following is an index to the novels in the order Bantam published them. Title changes and notes are enclosed by brackets.

Beginning with reprint #127, Bantam began collecting multiple novels in single omnibus volumes, and numbering by volume rather than title.


NOTE: A movie edition of The Man of Bronze, completely retypeset, with 8 pages of stills and a full color painting of Ron Ely as Doc on the back cover, was released in June, 1975, as a tie-in with the George Pal production, Doc Savage, The Man of Bronze. It was the 8th, and probably the most recent, printing. However, a Scholastic Book Club version of the same edition lists that as the 12th printing. Evidently, the book had numerous Scholastic printings, which are identical to the Bantam editions except for the lack of Bantam cover and spine logos, book numbers and printed price. The best-selling Doc Savage reprint is Brand of the Werewolf which sold over 185,000 copies!

Known for his art, J. G. Jones takes over the writing duties of “Doc Savage” with this month’s issue and his adoration of the character and his roots show through. After an involved story arc that was both personally motivating for Doc Savage and allowed a broader view of the “First Wave” world, Jones goes for a more basic adventure approach. It’s globetrotting and mummies for Doc and company, but that feels empty and without purpose. Things happen and characters move along their set path and there’s no reason to care except for it happening in “Doc Savage” #13 and that’s not a good enough reason.

There’s something comedic almost about Jones’s first big stab at writing featuring such grotesque, flat, ugly art. Qing Ping Mui’s style is one of incomprehensible perspectives and distorted heads with the idea that more lines mean more detail and stronger compositions. There’s a sheer incompetency in the way that he draws figures with child-like faces and heads that look like they were pressed on the page, and flattened, stretching them out in the process. More than that, every character features the same body, nothing setting Doc Savage, for example, apart from anyone else besides his haircut and extra-babyish face.

In a superficial manner, Jones’s writing adheres to the Doc Savage pulps with an adventure that spans the globe, a mummy to fight, and an evil group to stop. But, all that’s there is surface. Doc Savage isn’t so much a character as a human-like figure that goes through the intended motions of the plot. First, he fights the mummy and, then, he goes here, never expressing any thought except to advance the plot in the most direct fashion.

Years later, with the advent of inexpensive home computers you check your work. You decide that you were pretty close. Not bad for a bored 15 year-old.

What had you found? Well, the most used word is the . This isn’t a big suprise since most books started with the . How many? 119 with 13 serving their place in the middle of titles.

As a matter of fact, there are 599 total words in the Doc Savage titles (counting hypenated words as 1 each, of course) and 37 words occur at least 3 times. Still with me? After “the” the (are you trying to say this out loud?) next most used word is of (26). That’s no suprise, but it’s followed by Death (13), Terror (12), and some form of Devil (11). The others used 5 or more times are: Man (9), Men (6), Black (6), in (6), Island or Isle (6), Fear (5), and Mystery (5).

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

The Bantam Books Doc Savage Series : Bantam Books reprinted all of the Doc Savage novels and then some. Following is an index to the novels in the order Bantam published them. Title changes and notes are enclosed by brackets.

Beginning with reprint #127, Bantam began collecting multiple novels in single omnibus volumes, and numbering by volume rather than title.


NOTE: A movie edition of The Man of Bronze, completely retypeset, with 8 pages of stills and a full color painting of Ron Ely as Doc on the back cover, was released in June, 1975, as a tie-in with the George Pal production, Doc Savage, The Man of Bronze. It was the 8th, and probably the most recent, printing. However, a Scholastic Book Club version of the same edition lists that as the 12th printing. Evidently, the book had numerous Scholastic printings, which are identical to the Bantam editions except for the lack of Bantam cover and spine logos, book numbers and printed price. The best-selling Doc Savage reprint is Brand of the Werewolf which sold over 185,000 copies!

Known for his art, J. G. Jones takes over the writing duties of “Doc Savage” with this month’s issue and his adoration of the character and his roots show through. After an involved story arc that was both personally motivating for Doc Savage and allowed a broader view of the “First Wave” world, Jones goes for a more basic adventure approach. It’s globetrotting and mummies for Doc and company, but that feels empty and without purpose. Things happen and characters move along their set path and there’s no reason to care except for it happening in “Doc Savage” #13 and that’s not a good enough reason.

There’s something comedic almost about Jones’s first big stab at writing featuring such grotesque, flat, ugly art. Qing Ping Mui’s style is one of incomprehensible perspectives and distorted heads with the idea that more lines mean more detail and stronger compositions. There’s a sheer incompetency in the way that he draws figures with child-like faces and heads that look like they were pressed on the page, and flattened, stretching them out in the process. More than that, every character features the same body, nothing setting Doc Savage, for example, apart from anyone else besides his haircut and extra-babyish face.

In a superficial manner, Jones’s writing adheres to the Doc Savage pulps with an adventure that spans the globe, a mummy to fight, and an evil group to stop. But, all that’s there is surface. Doc Savage isn’t so much a character as a human-like figure that goes through the intended motions of the plot. First, he fights the mummy and, then, he goes here, never expressing any thought except to advance the plot in the most direct fashion.

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

The Bantam Books Doc Savage Series : Bantam Books reprinted all of the Doc Savage novels and then some. Following is an index to the novels in the order Bantam published them. Title changes and notes are enclosed by brackets.

Beginning with reprint #127, Bantam began collecting multiple novels in single omnibus volumes, and numbering by volume rather than title.


NOTE: A movie edition of The Man of Bronze, completely retypeset, with 8 pages of stills and a full color painting of Ron Ely as Doc on the back cover, was released in June, 1975, as a tie-in with the George Pal production, Doc Savage, The Man of Bronze. It was the 8th, and probably the most recent, printing. However, a Scholastic Book Club version of the same edition lists that as the 12th printing. Evidently, the book had numerous Scholastic printings, which are identical to the Bantam editions except for the lack of Bantam cover and spine logos, book numbers and printed price. The best-selling Doc Savage reprint is Brand of the Werewolf which sold over 185,000 copies!

Amazon.com: doc+savage+omnibus


Doc Savage Omnibus 13 (Doc Savage 178 - Goodreads

Posted by 2018 article

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