From the Protestant Reformation to the American Pledge of Allegiance to Michelangelo's painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel to Chinese Christians smuggling copies into secret house churches, the enormous theological, historical, political, social and cultural influences of the 27 books of the New Testament of the Christian Bible are staggering. Arising out of the Middle East in the first and second century, the New Testament's impact spread not only to the Western world but to Asia and is now exploding in what is called the Global South, giving rise to the most widespread religion in the world at over 2 billion people: Christianity.

The New Testament records the life of an early first-century Jewish man named Jesus of Nazareth who claimed to be not only the Messiah (or Christ) prophesied about in the Jewish Old Testament, but also the Son of God. Jesus said he came to offer eternal spiritual salvation "by grace through faith," rather than through sacrifice, as Jewish law required, thereby offering a new covenant ("testament"); this covenant was also open to everyone, not just Jews. According to the New Testament, Jesus’ controversial claims led to his execution by crucifixion, instigated by Jewish priests and carried out by the Roman government.

The New Testament book of 1 Corinthians reports that more than 500 people witnessed Jesus appear alive after his death, began to call themselves Christians and spread this "Good News" across the continent. These Christians were heavily persecuted for their beliefs because they refused to bow to Roman gods or Caesar and caused considerable public disturbance with their preaching, which the Roman government found threatening to its power. The conversion of countless gentiles to Christianity also angered pagan temple sellers of idols and images, who lost customers.

From the Protestant Reformation to the American Pledge of Allegiance to Michelangelo's painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel to Chinese Christians smuggling copies into secret house churches, the enormous theological, historical, political, social and cultural influences of the 27 books of the New Testament of the Christian Bible are staggering. Arising out of the Middle East in the first and second century, the New Testament's impact spread not only to the Western world but to Asia and is now exploding in what is called the Global South, giving rise to the most widespread religion in the world at over 2 billion people: Christianity.

The New Testament records the life of an early first-century Jewish man named Jesus of Nazareth who claimed to be not only the Messiah (or Christ) prophesied about in the Jewish Old Testament, but also the Son of God. Jesus said he came to offer eternal spiritual salvation "by grace through faith," rather than through sacrifice, as Jewish law required, thereby offering a new covenant ("testament"); this covenant was also open to everyone, not just Jews. According to the New Testament, Jesus’ controversial claims led to his execution by crucifixion, instigated by Jewish priests and carried out by the Roman government.

The New Testament book of 1 Corinthians reports that more than 500 people witnessed Jesus appear alive after his death, began to call themselves Christians and spread this "Good News" across the continent. These Christians were heavily persecuted for their beliefs because they refused to bow to Roman gods or Caesar and caused considerable public disturbance with their preaching, which the Roman government found threatening to its power. The conversion of countless gentiles to Christianity also angered pagan temple sellers of idols and images, who lost customers.

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The Bible is not just one book, but an entire library, with stories, songs, poetry, letters and history, as well as literature that might more obviously qualify as 'religious'.

The Christian Bible has two sections, the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament is the original Hebrew Bible, the sacred scriptures of the Jewish faith, written at different times between about 1200 and 165 BC. The New Testament books were written by Christians in the first century AD.

The Hebrew Bible has 39 books, written over a long period of time, and is the literary archive of the ancient nation of Israel. It was traditionally arranged in three sections.

From the Protestant Reformation to the American Pledge of Allegiance to Michelangelo's painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel to Chinese Christians smuggling copies into secret house churches, the enormous theological, historical, political, social and cultural influences of the 27 books of the New Testament of the Christian Bible are staggering. Arising out of the Middle East in the first and second century, the New Testament's impact spread not only to the Western world but to Asia and is now exploding in what is called the Global South, giving rise to the most widespread religion in the world at over 2 billion people: Christianity.

The New Testament records the life of an early first-century Jewish man named Jesus of Nazareth who claimed to be not only the Messiah (or Christ) prophesied about in the Jewish Old Testament, but also the Son of God. Jesus said he came to offer eternal spiritual salvation "by grace through faith," rather than through sacrifice, as Jewish law required, thereby offering a new covenant ("testament"); this covenant was also open to everyone, not just Jews. According to the New Testament, Jesus’ controversial claims led to his execution by crucifixion, instigated by Jewish priests and carried out by the Roman government.

The New Testament book of 1 Corinthians reports that more than 500 people witnessed Jesus appear alive after his death, began to call themselves Christians and spread this "Good News" across the continent. These Christians were heavily persecuted for their beliefs because they refused to bow to Roman gods or Caesar and caused considerable public disturbance with their preaching, which the Roman government found threatening to its power. The conversion of countless gentiles to Christianity also angered pagan temple sellers of idols and images, who lost customers.

Matt Slick Live Radio
Radio Show Survey
3-4pm PST; 4-5pm MST; 6-7pm EST; 1/24/18
Call in with your questions at 877-207-2276
Watch on YouTube, Facebook

The New Testament - Faithful New Testament


2. Introduction to the New Testament | Bible.org

Posted by 2018 article

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