Even when Smalley won the vacant shortstop position, he was still considered a temporary stand-in for a longterm replacement. The team had identified Smalley as 'the Yankees' third baseman of the future ." But it turns out they must have bought their crystal ball on the cheap in Chinatown. Smalley battled injuries, couldn't hit for power, and in 1984 was traded to the White Sox. So much for the future.

When Meacham didn't pan out, the Yankees subbed in the forgettable Tolleson to take over while they again looked for someone more permanent. The utilityman appeared ready to rise to the occasion, saying in 1987, "I've always felt that if I could get my foot in the door, I'd kick it open.'' Turns out when Tolleson kicked the door it shattered his ankle (metaphorically), and he stayed decidedly on the outside. His time as a starter was was short-lived, and the Yankees held onto him as a backup for another three years afterward, before he road off into the sunset of obscurity.

Espinoza took over for the 1989 season, leading a New York Times writer to introduce him to fans with, "Alvaro Espinoza is neither Ozzie Smith nor Ozzie Guillen; his glove does not dazzle. He is simply capable. He makes the plays." YANKEE SHORTSTOP FEVER, CATCH IT! Espinoza lasted only three seasons as the Yankees' shortstop, doing a somewhat serviceable job. It was when young Carlos Rodriguez rose up as the shortstop of the team's future that Espinoza's days were clearly numbered. Rodriguez, however, never made it big, causing yet another setback within the Yankees' organization. Leaving the spot to be open for yet another "great new hope."

Derek Jeter spoke for just five minutes Sunday night, showing perhaps a bit more emotion than usual.   (Photo: Adam Hunger, USA TODAY Sports)

Even when Smalley won the vacant shortstop position, he was still considered a temporary stand-in for a longterm replacement. The team had identified Smalley as 'the Yankees' third baseman of the future ." But it turns out they must have bought their crystal ball on the cheap in Chinatown. Smalley battled injuries, couldn't hit for power, and in 1984 was traded to the White Sox. So much for the future.

When Meacham didn't pan out, the Yankees subbed in the forgettable Tolleson to take over while they again looked for someone more permanent. The utilityman appeared ready to rise to the occasion, saying in 1987, "I've always felt that if I could get my foot in the door, I'd kick it open.'' Turns out when Tolleson kicked the door it shattered his ankle (metaphorically), and he stayed decidedly on the outside. His time as a starter was was short-lived, and the Yankees held onto him as a backup for another three years afterward, before he road off into the sunset of obscurity.

Espinoza took over for the 1989 season, leading a New York Times writer to introduce him to fans with, "Alvaro Espinoza is neither Ozzie Smith nor Ozzie Guillen; his glove does not dazzle. He is simply capable. He makes the plays." YANKEE SHORTSTOP FEVER, CATCH IT! Espinoza lasted only three seasons as the Yankees' shortstop, doing a somewhat serviceable job. It was when young Carlos Rodriguez rose up as the shortstop of the team's future that Espinoza's days were clearly numbered. Rodriguez, however, never made it big, causing yet another setback within the Yankees' organization. Leaving the spot to be open for yet another "great new hope."

Derek Jeter spoke for just five minutes Sunday night, showing perhaps a bit more emotion than usual.   (Photo: Adam Hunger, USA TODAY Sports)

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Even when Smalley won the vacant shortstop position, he was still considered a temporary stand-in for a longterm replacement. The team had identified Smalley as 'the Yankees' third baseman of the future ." But it turns out they must have bought their crystal ball on the cheap in Chinatown. Smalley battled injuries, couldn't hit for power, and in 1984 was traded to the White Sox. So much for the future.

When Meacham didn't pan out, the Yankees subbed in the forgettable Tolleson to take over while they again looked for someone more permanent. The utilityman appeared ready to rise to the occasion, saying in 1987, "I've always felt that if I could get my foot in the door, I'd kick it open.'' Turns out when Tolleson kicked the door it shattered his ankle (metaphorically), and he stayed decidedly on the outside. His time as a starter was was short-lived, and the Yankees held onto him as a backup for another three years afterward, before he road off into the sunset of obscurity.

Espinoza took over for the 1989 season, leading a New York Times writer to introduce him to fans with, "Alvaro Espinoza is neither Ozzie Smith nor Ozzie Guillen; his glove does not dazzle. He is simply capable. He makes the plays." YANKEE SHORTSTOP FEVER, CATCH IT! Espinoza lasted only three seasons as the Yankees' shortstop, doing a somewhat serviceable job. It was when young Carlos Rodriguez rose up as the shortstop of the team's future that Espinoza's days were clearly numbered. Rodriguez, however, never made it big, causing yet another setback within the Yankees' organization. Leaving the spot to be open for yet another "great new hope."

The Shortstop Who Knew Too Much - Fantastic Fiction


The Shortstop Who Knew Too Much by Dan Gutman

Posted by 2018 article

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