A t the court of Navarre, the king and his lords vow to devote themselves to study and abstain from women, but following the arrival of the princess of France and her ladies, they inevitably all fall in love. Chaos (and comedy) ensue.

The plot of Love's Labour's Lost is familiar enough, but this production, by Deafinitely Theatre and directed by Paula Garfield, is a first: the first full-length Shakespeare play to be performed in British Sign Language (BSL). The company, including assistant director Andrew Muir and creative interpreter Kate Furby, translated the language of the play into modern English and then into a suitably theatrical version of BSL; while BSL is the central language, each supports the other. The actors sign their lines while surtitles provide a clear and concise synopsis in English; the on-stage musicians provide a constant background narrative.

Interestingly, an expressive visual language also suits the Globe space well: the audience is not only close to the stage but a part of the action, with the actors acknowledging them with a nod, a wink or a table-turning heckle, and often executing their exits and entrances by boisterously making their way through the crowded yard as though it's a Monday morning rush hour.

Please see below the seating plan for Theatre Royal Haymarket showing Loves Labours Lost. For ease of viewing we have implemented a magnified view of the seating area. All you need to do is just scroll the mouse over the seating plan.

Please see below a quick guide to specific seating areas of the theatre. Please note that this is a general guide and each theatre would not necessarily have all the areas described below:

Stalls or Orchestra Stalls: On level and closest to the stage. Stalls are generally the most expensive seats providing the best views of the stage. Stalls seats are slightly raised as they go back, although this might vary from theatre to theatre.

An update of the classic Shakespeare story, director Kenneth Branagh shot this movie like a classic 30s musical. Love’s Labour’s Lost tells the story of four best friends who swear off love.

Director: Kenneth Branagh
Writers: William Shakespeare (play), Kenneth Branagh (screenplay)
Stars: Alessandro Nivola, Alicia Silverstone, Natascha McElhone

A t the court of Navarre, the king and his lords vow to devote themselves to study and abstain from women, but following the arrival of the princess of France and her ladies, they inevitably all fall in love. Chaos (and comedy) ensue.

The plot of Love's Labour's Lost is familiar enough, but this production, by Deafinitely Theatre and directed by Paula Garfield, is a first: the first full-length Shakespeare play to be performed in British Sign Language (BSL). The company, including assistant director Andrew Muir and creative interpreter Kate Furby, translated the language of the play into modern English and then into a suitably theatrical version of BSL; while BSL is the central language, each supports the other. The actors sign their lines while surtitles provide a clear and concise synopsis in English; the on-stage musicians provide a constant background narrative.

Interestingly, an expressive visual language also suits the Globe space well: the audience is not only close to the stage but a part of the action, with the actors acknowledging them with a nod, a wink or a table-turning heckle, and often executing their exits and entrances by boisterously making their way through the crowded yard as though it's a Monday morning rush hour.

Please see below the seating plan for Theatre Royal Haymarket showing Loves Labours Lost. For ease of viewing we have implemented a magnified view of the seating area. All you need to do is just scroll the mouse over the seating plan.

Please see below a quick guide to specific seating areas of the theatre. Please note that this is a general guide and each theatre would not necessarily have all the areas described below:

Stalls or Orchestra Stalls: On level and closest to the stage. Stalls are generally the most expensive seats providing the best views of the stage. Stalls seats are slightly raised as they go back, although this might vary from theatre to theatre.

A t the court of Navarre, the king and his lords vow to devote themselves to study and abstain from women, but following the arrival of the princess of France and her ladies, they inevitably all fall in love. Chaos (and comedy) ensue.

The plot of Love's Labour's Lost is familiar enough, but this production, by Deafinitely Theatre and directed by Paula Garfield, is a first: the first full-length Shakespeare play to be performed in British Sign Language (BSL). The company, including assistant director Andrew Muir and creative interpreter Kate Furby, translated the language of the play into modern English and then into a suitably theatrical version of BSL; while BSL is the central language, each supports the other. The actors sign their lines while surtitles provide a clear and concise synopsis in English; the on-stage musicians provide a constant background narrative.

Interestingly, an expressive visual language also suits the Globe space well: the audience is not only close to the stage but a part of the action, with the actors acknowledging them with a nod, a wink or a table-turning heckle, and often executing their exits and entrances by boisterously making their way through the crowded yard as though it's a Monday morning rush hour.

A t the court of Navarre, the king and his lords vow to devote themselves to study and abstain from women, but following the arrival of the princess of France and her ladies, they inevitably all fall in love. Chaos (and comedy) ensue.

The plot of Love's Labour's Lost is familiar enough, but this production, by Deafinitely Theatre and directed by Paula Garfield, is a first: the first full-length Shakespeare play to be performed in British Sign Language (BSL). The company, including assistant director Andrew Muir and creative interpreter Kate Furby, translated the language of the play into modern English and then into a suitably theatrical version of BSL; while BSL is the central language, each supports the other. The actors sign their lines while surtitles provide a clear and concise synopsis in English; the on-stage musicians provide a constant background narrative.

Interestingly, an expressive visual language also suits the Globe space well: the audience is not only close to the stage but a part of the action, with the actors acknowledging them with a nod, a wink or a table-turning heckle, and often executing their exits and entrances by boisterously making their way through the crowded yard as though it's a Monday morning rush hour.

Please see below the seating plan for Theatre Royal Haymarket showing Loves Labours Lost. For ease of viewing we have implemented a magnified view of the seating area. All you need to do is just scroll the mouse over the seating plan.

Please see below a quick guide to specific seating areas of the theatre. Please note that this is a general guide and each theatre would not necessarily have all the areas described below:

Stalls or Orchestra Stalls: On level and closest to the stage. Stalls are generally the most expensive seats providing the best views of the stage. Stalls seats are slightly raised as they go back, although this might vary from theatre to theatre.

An update of the classic Shakespeare story, director Kenneth Branagh shot this movie like a classic 30s musical. Love’s Labour’s Lost tells the story of four best friends who swear off love.

Director: Kenneth Branagh
Writers: William Shakespeare (play), Kenneth Branagh (screenplay)
Stars: Alessandro Nivola, Alicia Silverstone, Natascha McElhone

Красота по-американски (1999)
# 63 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Shailene Woodley »
# 67 on STARmeter

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Love s Labour s Won - Wikipedia


Love s Labour s Lost (2000) - IMDb

Posted by 2018 article

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