Courtroom victory cannot always be gained through sheer legal firepower alone. In a trial, the heavy cannons of argument and evidence can prove useless if not accurately targeted - i.e., locked on the jurors and what they need to see and hear. Off target, each powerful fusillade becomes mere fireworks, blazing brilliantly in the courtroom but accomplishing nothing. Think not? The first O.J. Simpson trial dramatically proved that a vast armada of damning evidence that is not insightfully presented can sink without a trace as if it did not exist.

It is true of course that trials do sometimes resemble massive B-52 bombing raids, with one side blowing huge holes in the opposing side's case, and blasting away all counter-arguments. Often, however, the successful trial is more guerrilla campaign, organized and conducted with perspicacity and focus to win the hearts and minds of the jurors.

To achieve these goals the attorney needs to understand the jurors - who they are, what motivates them, and how they make decisions. The answers to such questions comprise the primary subject material of psychology; and in particular, litigation psychology. The more knowledge the attorney possesses concerning psychology, and its courtroom ramifications, the better he or she can expect to do in court.

My next contribution to Research Digest . As it is about huge failure of psychology, it would be inappropriately to say “enjoy reading”, but I encourage you to do it anyway.

Courtroom victory cannot always be gained through sheer legal firepower alone. In a trial, the heavy cannons of argument and evidence can prove useless if not accurately targeted - i.e., locked on the jurors and what they need to see and hear. Off target, each powerful fusillade becomes mere fireworks, blazing brilliantly in the courtroom but accomplishing nothing. Think not? The first O.J. Simpson trial dramatically proved that a vast armada of damning evidence that is not insightfully presented can sink without a trace as if it did not exist.

It is true of course that trials do sometimes resemble massive B-52 bombing raids, with one side blowing huge holes in the opposing side's case, and blasting away all counter-arguments. Often, however, the successful trial is more guerrilla campaign, organized and conducted with perspicacity and focus to win the hearts and minds of the jurors.

To achieve these goals the attorney needs to understand the jurors - who they are, what motivates them, and how they make decisions. The answers to such questions comprise the primary subject material of psychology; and in particular, litigation psychology. The more knowledge the attorney possesses concerning psychology, and its courtroom ramifications, the better he or she can expect to do in court.

My next contribution to Research Digest . As it is about huge failure of psychology, it would be inappropriately to say “enjoy reading”, but I encourage you to do it anyway.

23.01.2017  · Post written by Dr Tomasz Witkowski for the BPS Research Digest... psychology can’t predict suicidal behaviours better than by coin flip”

01.01.2001  · Defends the failure of people to predict the future. Confusion between prediction and hindsight; How psychologists predict an outcome.

26.09.2013  · How do we predict and prevent violence? Psychology Today. Psychology Today... How can we better predict which individuals are most likely to commit acts ...

To encourage visitors to undertake a new behaviour on your  website, such as making a first purchase or playing a game, you might want to offer something to reward that activity. But when should you provide a reward and how do you encourage repetitive behaviour? This post examines reward psychology so that you can create an optimal reward schedule.

These were the same kind of question that the American psychologist  B. F. Skinner wanted to answer in the 1950s. He wanted to go beyond the work of Pavlov on ‘classical conditioning’ and investigate how rewards influence behaviour.

Pavlov discovered that animals (including humans) learn to respond automatically to certain stimuli (e.g. food) and that if you add further stimuli (e.g. a bell before the food arrives), you can also get them to automatically respond  to that (e.g. salivate) in the same way. If you then remove the original stimulus (e.g. food) animals will continue to respond to the new stimuli because the behaviour has become automatic.

Courtroom victory cannot always be gained through sheer legal firepower alone. In a trial, the heavy cannons of argument and evidence can prove useless if not accurately targeted - i.e., locked on the jurors and what they need to see and hear. Off target, each powerful fusillade becomes mere fireworks, blazing brilliantly in the courtroom but accomplishing nothing. Think not? The first O.J. Simpson trial dramatically proved that a vast armada of damning evidence that is not insightfully presented can sink without a trace as if it did not exist.

It is true of course that trials do sometimes resemble massive B-52 bombing raids, with one side blowing huge holes in the opposing side's case, and blasting away all counter-arguments. Often, however, the successful trial is more guerrilla campaign, organized and conducted with perspicacity and focus to win the hearts and minds of the jurors.

To achieve these goals the attorney needs to understand the jurors - who they are, what motivates them, and how they make decisions. The answers to such questions comprise the primary subject material of psychology; and in particular, litigation psychology. The more knowledge the attorney possesses concerning psychology, and its courtroom ramifications, the better he or she can expect to do in court.

Courtroom victory cannot always be gained through sheer legal firepower alone. In a trial, the heavy cannons of argument and evidence can prove useless if not accurately targeted - i.e., locked on the jurors and what they need to see and hear. Off target, each powerful fusillade becomes mere fireworks, blazing brilliantly in the courtroom but accomplishing nothing. Think not? The first O.J. Simpson trial dramatically proved that a vast armada of damning evidence that is not insightfully presented can sink without a trace as if it did not exist.

It is true of course that trials do sometimes resemble massive B-52 bombing raids, with one side blowing huge holes in the opposing side's case, and blasting away all counter-arguments. Often, however, the successful trial is more guerrilla campaign, organized and conducted with perspicacity and focus to win the hearts and minds of the jurors.

To achieve these goals the attorney needs to understand the jurors - who they are, what motivates them, and how they make decisions. The answers to such questions comprise the primary subject material of psychology; and in particular, litigation psychology. The more knowledge the attorney possesses concerning psychology, and its courtroom ramifications, the better he or she can expect to do in court.

My next contribution to Research Digest . As it is about huge failure of psychology, it would be inappropriately to say “enjoy reading”, but I encourage you to do it anyway.

23.01.2017  · Post written by Dr Tomasz Witkowski for the BPS Research Digest... psychology can’t predict suicidal behaviours better than by coin flip”

01.01.2001  · Defends the failure of people to predict the future. Confusion between prediction and hindsight; How psychologists predict an outcome.

26.09.2013  · How do we predict and prevent violence? Psychology Today. Psychology Today... How can we better predict which individuals are most likely to commit acts ...

How to Predict and Prevent Violence | Psychology Today


We Can t Predict the Future--And That s. - Psychology Today

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