The early days of Italian Horror started and ended in 1921 with IL MOSTRO DE FRANKENSTEIN , which was basically just an Italian take on the Frankenstein legend. Once the movie was completed, the crew and visionaries from IL MOSTRO DE FRANKENSTEIN moved to Germany in search of more lucrative offerings. Which they found quickly. The Italian/German crew from IL MOSTRO continued to make successful pictures in Germany for many years. But what was to be the beginning of a new Italian legacy faded out with a single picture fizzle, and another horror movie wasn’t made in Italy until 35 years later…

The Italians main concern was always style over substance. And with that attitude they came up with some of the most original movies of all time. The funds this small family of filmmakers lacked, they made up for with immense imagination.

Italian Horror of course still exits to this day, but it hasn’t had the same freshness and vitality since Michele Soavi’s CEMETERY MAN , which came out in 1994.

Ingmar Bergman: the BFI presents a comprehensive season of the Swedish auteur’s work to celebrate his centenary.

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    The Vampire and the Ballerina – original title:  L’amante del vampiro “The Vampire’s Lover” – is a 1960 Italian supernatural horror film directed by Renato Polselli ( Mania ; Black Magic Rites ; Delirium ) from a screenplay co-written with  Ernesto Gastaldi and Giuseppe Pellegrini. Hélène Rémy, Tina Gloriani and Walter Brandi star.

    A troupe of beautiful young dancers find themselves stranded in a sinister, spooky old castle, not knowing that it is home to a group of vampires…

    “Coupled with the smooth direction from Polselli is some really fantastic cinematography that uses lighting and shadow effectively to make this film really come alive, as well as some great locales including the waterfall and the spooky castle. Being an Italian horror film you can also expect a fair amount of eroticism and it is peppered throughout the movie like a trail of candy for you to follow.”  The Telltale Mind


    The early days of Italian Horror started and ended in 1921 with IL MOSTRO DE FRANKENSTEIN , which was basically just an Italian take on the Frankenstein legend. Once the movie was completed, the crew and visionaries from IL MOSTRO DE FRANKENSTEIN moved to Germany in search of more lucrative offerings. Which they found quickly. The Italian/German crew from IL MOSTRO continued to make successful pictures in Germany for many years. But what was to be the beginning of a new Italian legacy faded out with a single picture fizzle, and another horror movie wasn’t made in Italy until 35 years later…

    The Italians main concern was always style over substance. And with that attitude they came up with some of the most original movies of all time. The funds this small family of filmmakers lacked, they made up for with immense imagination.

    Italian Horror of course still exits to this day, but it hasn’t had the same freshness and vitality since Michele Soavi’s CEMETERY MAN , which came out in 1994.

    Ingmar Bergman: the BFI presents a comprehensive season of the Swedish auteur’s work to celebrate his centenary.

  • I want to…

    Sight & Sound’s 25 best films of 2017

  • I want to…

    Discover how BFI NETWORK is supporting new and emerging filmmakers

  • I want to…


    The early days of Italian Horror started and ended in 1921 with IL MOSTRO DE FRANKENSTEIN , which was basically just an Italian take on the Frankenstein legend. Once the movie was completed, the crew and visionaries from IL MOSTRO DE FRANKENSTEIN moved to Germany in search of more lucrative offerings. Which they found quickly. The Italian/German crew from IL MOSTRO continued to make successful pictures in Germany for many years. But what was to be the beginning of a new Italian legacy faded out with a single picture fizzle, and another horror movie wasn’t made in Italy until 35 years later…

    The Italians main concern was always style over substance. And with that attitude they came up with some of the most original movies of all time. The funds this small family of filmmakers lacked, they made up for with immense imagination.

    Italian Horror of course still exits to this day, but it hasn’t had the same freshness and vitality since Michele Soavi’s CEMETERY MAN , which came out in 1994.

    10 great Italian gothic horror films | BFI


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