Called the weak underbelly of the West Antarctic ice sheet, the Amundsen Sea region contains several fast-moving glaciers, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler. Many Antarctic glaciers have offshore ice shelves that hold them in place like a dam. But there is very little fixed, offshore ice in the Amundsen Sea, so the glaciers flow freely. These rivers of ice drain one third of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

In a separate study published in March 2014 in Geophysical Research Letters, Rignot and colleagues Jeremie Mouginot and Bernd Scheuchl found that these glaciers have been speeding up, as shown in the map above. Changes in ice flow between 1996 and 2008 are shown in red (accelerating) and blue (slowing). The changes were calculated from a variety of satellite observations, including visible light and radar observations that measure how fast the surface is moving, and satellite altimeter measurements of the height of the ice (for estimating thickness). Most of the glaciers have been flowing faster, and the changes extend far inland.

Rignot’s May 2014 recent paper examines why the glaciers have been flowing more quickly and what that means for the future of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. First, the team identified the grounding line for each glacier; that is, the place where the ice is anchored to the coast or seafloor. Beyond that point, the glaciers float on ocean water. The floating segments rise and fall with the tides. Rignot and his team used satellite radar interferometry to map changes in ice height over time and identify the grounding lines.

Physiological parameters that characterize human capabilities (mobility, reproduction or the capacity to perform tasks) evolve throughout the life cycle. The physical and intellectual abilities follow the same pattern, starting at the moment of conception: The performance of each individual is limited at birth, then increases to a peak before declining until death. With these findings, Geoffroy Berthelot and Stephane Len modeled the careers of more than 2,000 athletes (from a panel of 25 Olympic disciplines) and grandmasters of chess. They demonstrate a simple relation between changes in performance and the age of individuals.

This study suggests that technical change, energy consumption and development strongly influenced the performance of individuals. These have increased significantly over the last century compared to today's values. Ultimately, the modeling of changes in performance with age can be extended to all individuals and lead to an estimate of life expectancy.

Further research will refine these descriptive models and apply them to other areas of human activity (scientific, economic, ecological ...), and test their viability, which may help to assess the relationships of man to his environment.

A boss at leading global software firm Progress says companies which don’t go all-in on artificial intelligence face “a path of irreversible decline”.

Mark Armstrong is a VP and international MD at the Massachusetts –based firm which originally spun out of MIT in 1981.

“Companies are drawn to the allure and potential of new technology, but are put off by the difficulties of implementation and getting tangible results from it,” Armstrong told BusinessCloud. “Recognising how great new technology is isn’t enough. It’s about adapting to get the tangible results from these new technologies.

The reason behind star KIC 8462852’s mysterious dimming, which had been attributed to an extraterrestrial civilization at one point, appears to have been identified. 

“A new study using NASA’s Spitzer and Swift missions, as well as the Belgian AstroLAB IRIS observatory, suggests that the cause of the dimming over long periods is likely an uneven dust cloud moving around the star," according to a  NASA  press release.

“This pretty much rules out the alien megastructure theory…,” Huan Meng, the paper’s lead author noted.                    

The Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University in Lucknow is in a state of “complete and practically irreversible decline and collapse”, a government-backed audit report has said, highlighting divisions on caste lines in the central institution that have resulted in “physical, academic and administrative rowdyism at all levels”.

The “final death knell” of the university is the “role of caste and the part it has played in completely polarising the institution into various groups, special interests, political groupings”, the report said.

Hindustan Times has a copy of the report, which also said the quality of students was not at par with the desired standard of a central university, set up in 1996 and named after the Dalit icon of the country.

With-profits funds are in “irreversible decline” despite providers professing their commitment to the market, advisers say.

Last week, Legal & General said it was closing its with-profit funds to new business because of falling sales as a result of the introduction of the RDR.

Prudential , Aviva , Royal London  and LV= insist they have no plans to follow suit but advisers say the products have been replaced by modern investments.

Called the weak underbelly of the West Antarctic ice sheet, the Amundsen Sea region contains several fast-moving glaciers, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler. Many Antarctic glaciers have offshore ice shelves that hold them in place like a dam. But there is very little fixed, offshore ice in the Amundsen Sea, so the glaciers flow freely. These rivers of ice drain one third of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

In a separate study published in March 2014 in Geophysical Research Letters, Rignot and colleagues Jeremie Mouginot and Bernd Scheuchl found that these glaciers have been speeding up, as shown in the map above. Changes in ice flow between 1996 and 2008 are shown in red (accelerating) and blue (slowing). The changes were calculated from a variety of satellite observations, including visible light and radar observations that measure how fast the surface is moving, and satellite altimeter measurements of the height of the ice (for estimating thickness). Most of the glaciers have been flowing faster, and the changes extend far inland.

Rignot’s May 2014 recent paper examines why the glaciers have been flowing more quickly and what that means for the future of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. First, the team identified the grounding line for each glacier; that is, the place where the ice is anchored to the coast or seafloor. Beyond that point, the glaciers float on ocean water. The floating segments rise and fall with the tides. Rignot and his team used satellite radar interferometry to map changes in ice height over time and identify the grounding lines.

Called the weak underbelly of the West Antarctic ice sheet, the Amundsen Sea region contains several fast-moving glaciers, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler. Many Antarctic glaciers have offshore ice shelves that hold them in place like a dam. But there is very little fixed, offshore ice in the Amundsen Sea, so the glaciers flow freely. These rivers of ice drain one third of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

In a separate study published in March 2014 in Geophysical Research Letters, Rignot and colleagues Jeremie Mouginot and Bernd Scheuchl found that these glaciers have been speeding up, as shown in the map above. Changes in ice flow between 1996 and 2008 are shown in red (accelerating) and blue (slowing). The changes were calculated from a variety of satellite observations, including visible light and radar observations that measure how fast the surface is moving, and satellite altimeter measurements of the height of the ice (for estimating thickness). Most of the glaciers have been flowing faster, and the changes extend far inland.

Rignot’s May 2014 recent paper examines why the glaciers have been flowing more quickly and what that means for the future of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. First, the team identified the grounding line for each glacier; that is, the place where the ice is anchored to the coast or seafloor. Beyond that point, the glaciers float on ocean water. The floating segments rise and fall with the tides. Rignot and his team used satellite radar interferometry to map changes in ice height over time and identify the grounding lines.

Physiological parameters that characterize human capabilities (mobility, reproduction or the capacity to perform tasks) evolve throughout the life cycle. The physical and intellectual abilities follow the same pattern, starting at the moment of conception: The performance of each individual is limited at birth, then increases to a peak before declining until death. With these findings, Geoffroy Berthelot and Stephane Len modeled the careers of more than 2,000 athletes (from a panel of 25 Olympic disciplines) and grandmasters of chess. They demonstrate a simple relation between changes in performance and the age of individuals.

This study suggests that technical change, energy consumption and development strongly influenced the performance of individuals. These have increased significantly over the last century compared to today's values. Ultimately, the modeling of changes in performance with age can be extended to all individuals and lead to an estimate of life expectancy.

Further research will refine these descriptive models and apply them to other areas of human activity (scientific, economic, ecological ...), and test their viability, which may help to assess the relationships of man to his environment.

A boss at leading global software firm Progress says companies which don’t go all-in on artificial intelligence face “a path of irreversible decline”.

Mark Armstrong is a VP and international MD at the Massachusetts –based firm which originally spun out of MIT in 1981.

“Companies are drawn to the allure and potential of new technology, but are put off by the difficulties of implementation and getting tangible results from it,” Armstrong told BusinessCloud. “Recognising how great new technology is isn’t enough. It’s about adapting to get the tangible results from these new technologies.

The reason behind star KIC 8462852’s mysterious dimming, which had been attributed to an extraterrestrial civilization at one point, appears to have been identified. 

“A new study using NASA’s Spitzer and Swift missions, as well as the Belgian AstroLAB IRIS observatory, suggests that the cause of the dimming over long periods is likely an uneven dust cloud moving around the star," according to a  NASA  press release.

“This pretty much rules out the alien megastructure theory…,” Huan Meng, the paper’s lead author noted.                    

Called the weak underbelly of the West Antarctic ice sheet, the Amundsen Sea region contains several fast-moving glaciers, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler. Many Antarctic glaciers have offshore ice shelves that hold them in place like a dam. But there is very little fixed, offshore ice in the Amundsen Sea, so the glaciers flow freely. These rivers of ice drain one third of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

In a separate study published in March 2014 in Geophysical Research Letters, Rignot and colleagues Jeremie Mouginot and Bernd Scheuchl found that these glaciers have been speeding up, as shown in the map above. Changes in ice flow between 1996 and 2008 are shown in red (accelerating) and blue (slowing). The changes were calculated from a variety of satellite observations, including visible light and radar observations that measure how fast the surface is moving, and satellite altimeter measurements of the height of the ice (for estimating thickness). Most of the glaciers have been flowing faster, and the changes extend far inland.

Rignot’s May 2014 recent paper examines why the glaciers have been flowing more quickly and what that means for the future of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. First, the team identified the grounding line for each glacier; that is, the place where the ice is anchored to the coast or seafloor. Beyond that point, the glaciers float on ocean water. The floating segments rise and fall with the tides. Rignot and his team used satellite radar interferometry to map changes in ice height over time and identify the grounding lines.

Physiological parameters that characterize human capabilities (mobility, reproduction or the capacity to perform tasks) evolve throughout the life cycle. The physical and intellectual abilities follow the same pattern, starting at the moment of conception: The performance of each individual is limited at birth, then increases to a peak before declining until death. With these findings, Geoffroy Berthelot and Stephane Len modeled the careers of more than 2,000 athletes (from a panel of 25 Olympic disciplines) and grandmasters of chess. They demonstrate a simple relation between changes in performance and the age of individuals.

This study suggests that technical change, energy consumption and development strongly influenced the performance of individuals. These have increased significantly over the last century compared to today's values. Ultimately, the modeling of changes in performance with age can be extended to all individuals and lead to an estimate of life expectancy.

Further research will refine these descriptive models and apply them to other areas of human activity (scientific, economic, ecological ...), and test their viability, which may help to assess the relationships of man to his environment.

A boss at leading global software firm Progress says companies which don’t go all-in on artificial intelligence face “a path of irreversible decline”.

Mark Armstrong is a VP and international MD at the Massachusetts –based firm which originally spun out of MIT in 1981.

“Companies are drawn to the allure and potential of new technology, but are put off by the difficulties of implementation and getting tangible results from it,” Armstrong told BusinessCloud. “Recognising how great new technology is isn’t enough. It’s about adapting to get the tangible results from these new technologies.

Called the weak underbelly of the West Antarctic ice sheet, the Amundsen Sea region contains several fast-moving glaciers, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler. Many Antarctic glaciers have offshore ice shelves that hold them in place like a dam. But there is very little fixed, offshore ice in the Amundsen Sea, so the glaciers flow freely. These rivers of ice drain one third of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

In a separate study published in March 2014 in Geophysical Research Letters, Rignot and colleagues Jeremie Mouginot and Bernd Scheuchl found that these glaciers have been speeding up, as shown in the map above. Changes in ice flow between 1996 and 2008 are shown in red (accelerating) and blue (slowing). The changes were calculated from a variety of satellite observations, including visible light and radar observations that measure how fast the surface is moving, and satellite altimeter measurements of the height of the ice (for estimating thickness). Most of the glaciers have been flowing faster, and the changes extend far inland.

Rignot’s May 2014 recent paper examines why the glaciers have been flowing more quickly and what that means for the future of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. First, the team identified the grounding line for each glacier; that is, the place where the ice is anchored to the coast or seafloor. Beyond that point, the glaciers float on ocean water. The floating segments rise and fall with the tides. Rignot and his team used satellite radar interferometry to map changes in ice height over time and identify the grounding lines.

Physiological parameters that characterize human capabilities (mobility, reproduction or the capacity to perform tasks) evolve throughout the life cycle. The physical and intellectual abilities follow the same pattern, starting at the moment of conception: The performance of each individual is limited at birth, then increases to a peak before declining until death. With these findings, Geoffroy Berthelot and Stephane Len modeled the careers of more than 2,000 athletes (from a panel of 25 Olympic disciplines) and grandmasters of chess. They demonstrate a simple relation between changes in performance and the age of individuals.

This study suggests that technical change, energy consumption and development strongly influenced the performance of individuals. These have increased significantly over the last century compared to today's values. Ultimately, the modeling of changes in performance with age can be extended to all individuals and lead to an estimate of life expectancy.

Further research will refine these descriptive models and apply them to other areas of human activity (scientific, economic, ecological ...), and test their viability, which may help to assess the relationships of man to his environment.

Called the weak underbelly of the West Antarctic ice sheet, the Amundsen Sea region contains several fast-moving glaciers, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler. Many Antarctic glaciers have offshore ice shelves that hold them in place like a dam. But there is very little fixed, offshore ice in the Amundsen Sea, so the glaciers flow freely. These rivers of ice drain one third of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

In a separate study published in March 2014 in Geophysical Research Letters, Rignot and colleagues Jeremie Mouginot and Bernd Scheuchl found that these glaciers have been speeding up, as shown in the map above. Changes in ice flow between 1996 and 2008 are shown in red (accelerating) and blue (slowing). The changes were calculated from a variety of satellite observations, including visible light and radar observations that measure how fast the surface is moving, and satellite altimeter measurements of the height of the ice (for estimating thickness). Most of the glaciers have been flowing faster, and the changes extend far inland.

Rignot’s May 2014 recent paper examines why the glaciers have been flowing more quickly and what that means for the future of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. First, the team identified the grounding line for each glacier; that is, the place where the ice is anchored to the coast or seafloor. Beyond that point, the glaciers float on ocean water. The floating segments rise and fall with the tides. Rignot and his team used satellite radar interferometry to map changes in ice height over time and identify the grounding lines.

Physiological parameters that characterize human capabilities (mobility, reproduction or the capacity to perform tasks) evolve throughout the life cycle. The physical and intellectual abilities follow the same pattern, starting at the moment of conception: The performance of each individual is limited at birth, then increases to a peak before declining until death. With these findings, Geoffroy Berthelot and Stephane Len modeled the careers of more than 2,000 athletes (from a panel of 25 Olympic disciplines) and grandmasters of chess. They demonstrate a simple relation between changes in performance and the age of individuals.

This study suggests that technical change, energy consumption and development strongly influenced the performance of individuals. These have increased significantly over the last century compared to today's values. Ultimately, the modeling of changes in performance with age can be extended to all individuals and lead to an estimate of life expectancy.

Further research will refine these descriptive models and apply them to other areas of human activity (scientific, economic, ecological ...), and test their viability, which may help to assess the relationships of man to his environment.

A boss at leading global software firm Progress says companies which don’t go all-in on artificial intelligence face “a path of irreversible decline”.

Mark Armstrong is a VP and international MD at the Massachusetts –based firm which originally spun out of MIT in 1981.

“Companies are drawn to the allure and potential of new technology, but are put off by the difficulties of implementation and getting tangible results from it,” Armstrong told BusinessCloud. “Recognising how great new technology is isn’t enough. It’s about adapting to get the tangible results from these new technologies.

The reason behind star KIC 8462852’s mysterious dimming, which had been attributed to an extraterrestrial civilization at one point, appears to have been identified. 

“A new study using NASA’s Spitzer and Swift missions, as well as the Belgian AstroLAB IRIS observatory, suggests that the cause of the dimming over long periods is likely an uneven dust cloud moving around the star," according to a  NASA  press release.

“This pretty much rules out the alien megastructure theory…,” Huan Meng, the paper’s lead author noted.                    

The Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University in Lucknow is in a state of “complete and practically irreversible decline and collapse”, a government-backed audit report has said, highlighting divisions on caste lines in the central institution that have resulted in “physical, academic and administrative rowdyism at all levels”.

The “final death knell” of the university is the “role of caste and the part it has played in completely polarising the institution into various groups, special interests, political groupings”, the report said.

Hindustan Times has a copy of the report, which also said the quality of students was not at par with the desired standard of a central university, set up in 1996 and named after the Dalit icon of the country.

West Antarctic Glaciers in Irreversible Decline | Science.


NO HOPE - America s Irreversible Decline - YouTube

Posted by 2018 article

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