In New York City in 1999, I heard a talk in which Riki Anne Wilchins (self-styled ‘transexual menace’, and described in the Gender Variance Who’s Who as ‘one of the iconic transgender persons of the 1990s’) declared that feminists had no theory of gender. I thought: ‘what is she talking about? Surely feminists invented the concept of gender!’

Fast forward ten years to 2009, when I went to a bookfair in Edinburgh to speak about The Trouble & Strife Reader , a collection of writing from a feminist magazine I’d been involved with since the 1980s. Afterwards, two young women came up to chat. Interesting book, they said, but why is there nothing in it about gender?

Fast forward again to October 2016, when Pope Francis, during a pastoral visit to Georgia, denounced ‘gender theory’ as a threat to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. The correspondent who reported his comments explained :

A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes is a popular-science book on cosmology (the study of the universe) by British physicist Stephen Hawking . [1] It was first published in 1988. Hawking wrote the book for nonspecialist readers with no prior knowledge of scientific theories.

The book became a bestseller and sold more than 10 million copies in 20 years. [2] It was also on the London Sunday Times bestseller list for more than five years and was translated into 35 languages by 2001. [3]

In A Brief History of Time , Stephen Hawking attempts to explain a range of subjects in cosmology , including the Big Bang , black holes and light cones , to the nonspecialist reader. His main goal is to give an overview of the subject, but he also attempts to explain some complex mathematics . In the 1996 edition of the book and subsequent editions, Hawking discusses the possibility of time travel and wormholes and explores the possibility of having a universe without a quantum singularity at the beginning of time.

You've heard of the book "A Brief History of Time" by Stephen Hawking (who, incidentally, is on our Board of Sponsors)? Well, this is a brief history of the Bulletin 's Doomsday Clock, set to a song by Arielle Martinez Cohen, a high school student who wrote “Two Minutes to Midnight” after hearing about the Clock last year. You can get a free download of the song at CD Baby .

In New York City in 1999, I heard a talk in which Riki Anne Wilchins (self-styled ‘transexual menace’, and described in the Gender Variance Who’s Who as ‘one of the iconic transgender persons of the 1990s’) declared that feminists had no theory of gender. I thought: ‘what is she talking about? Surely feminists invented the concept of gender!’

Fast forward ten years to 2009, when I went to a bookfair in Edinburgh to speak about The Trouble & Strife Reader , a collection of writing from a feminist magazine I’d been involved with since the 1980s. Afterwards, two young women came up to chat. Interesting book, they said, but why is there nothing in it about gender?

Fast forward again to October 2016, when Pope Francis, during a pastoral visit to Georgia, denounced ‘gender theory’ as a threat to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. The correspondent who reported his comments explained :

In New York City in 1999, I heard a talk in which Riki Anne Wilchins (self-styled ‘transexual menace’, and described in the Gender Variance Who’s Who as ‘one of the iconic transgender persons of the 1990s’) declared that feminists had no theory of gender. I thought: ‘what is she talking about? Surely feminists invented the concept of gender!’

Fast forward ten years to 2009, when I went to a bookfair in Edinburgh to speak about The Trouble & Strife Reader , a collection of writing from a feminist magazine I’d been involved with since the 1980s. Afterwards, two young women came up to chat. Interesting book, they said, but why is there nothing in it about gender?

Fast forward again to October 2016, when Pope Francis, during a pastoral visit to Georgia, denounced ‘gender theory’ as a threat to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. The correspondent who reported his comments explained :

A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes is a popular-science book on cosmology (the study of the universe) by British physicist Stephen Hawking . [1] It was first published in 1988. Hawking wrote the book for nonspecialist readers with no prior knowledge of scientific theories.

The book became a bestseller and sold more than 10 million copies in 20 years. [2] It was also on the London Sunday Times bestseller list for more than five years and was translated into 35 languages by 2001. [3]

In A Brief History of Time , Stephen Hawking attempts to explain a range of subjects in cosmology , including the Big Bang , black holes and light cones , to the nonspecialist reader. His main goal is to give an overview of the subject, but he also attempts to explain some complex mathematics . In the 1996 edition of the book and subsequent editions, Hawking discusses the possibility of time travel and wormholes and explores the possibility of having a universe without a quantum singularity at the beginning of time.

You've heard of the book "A Brief History of Time" by Stephen Hawking (who, incidentally, is on our Board of Sponsors)? Well, this is a brief history of the Bulletin 's Doomsday Clock, set to a song by Arielle Martinez Cohen, a high school student who wrote “Two Minutes to Midnight” after hearing about the Clock last year. You can get a free download of the song at CD Baby .

The Constitution was remarkable, but deeply flawed. For one thing, it did not include a specific declaration - or bill - of individual rights. It specified what the government could do but did not say what it could not do. For another, it did not apply to everyone. The "consent of the governed" meant propertied white men only.

The absence of a "bill of rights" turned out to be an obstacle to the Constitution's ratification by the states. It would take four more years of intense debate before the new government's form would be resolved. The Federalists opposed including a bill of rights on the ground that it was unnecessary. The Anti-Federalists, who were afraid of a strong centralized government, refused to support the Constitution without one. 

In the end, popular sentiment was decisive. Recently freed from the despotic English monarchy, the American people wanted strong guarantees that the new government would not trample upon their newly won freedoms of speech, press and religion, nor upon their right to be free from warrantless searches and seizures. So, the Constitution's framers heeded Thomas Jefferson who argued: "A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference."

In New York City in 1999, I heard a talk in which Riki Anne Wilchins (self-styled ‘transexual menace’, and described in the Gender Variance Who’s Who as ‘one of the iconic transgender persons of the 1990s’) declared that feminists had no theory of gender. I thought: ‘what is she talking about? Surely feminists invented the concept of gender!’

Fast forward ten years to 2009, when I went to a bookfair in Edinburgh to speak about The Trouble & Strife Reader , a collection of writing from a feminist magazine I’d been involved with since the 1980s. Afterwards, two young women came up to chat. Interesting book, they said, but why is there nothing in it about gender?

Fast forward again to October 2016, when Pope Francis, during a pastoral visit to Georgia, denounced ‘gender theory’ as a threat to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. The correspondent who reported his comments explained :

A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes is a popular-science book on cosmology (the study of the universe) by British physicist Stephen Hawking . [1] It was first published in 1988. Hawking wrote the book for nonspecialist readers with no prior knowledge of scientific theories.

The book became a bestseller and sold more than 10 million copies in 20 years. [2] It was also on the London Sunday Times bestseller list for more than five years and was translated into 35 languages by 2001. [3]

In A Brief History of Time , Stephen Hawking attempts to explain a range of subjects in cosmology , including the Big Bang , black holes and light cones , to the nonspecialist reader. His main goal is to give an overview of the subject, but he also attempts to explain some complex mathematics . In the 1996 edition of the book and subsequent editions, Hawking discusses the possibility of time travel and wormholes and explores the possibility of having a universe without a quantum singularity at the beginning of time.

Brief History of the Internet | Internet Society


A Brief History Of The AR-15 : NPR

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