Site : Galápagos Islands
Location : Ecuador
Year Designated : 1978
Category : Natural
Criteria : (vii)(viii)(ix)(x)
Reason : This “living laboratory” of evolution helped to inspire Charles Darwin 175 years ago and continues to offer a unique opportunity to explore a pristine natural ecosystem.

The Galápagos Islands are located 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the South American mainland but a world apart from anywhere else on Earth. The archipelago and its surrounding waters, located where three ocean currents converge, are famed for the unique animal species that piqued the interest of Charles Darwin in 1835. Decades later Darwin drew on his experiences here when penning his landmark theory of evolution by natural selection.

The actively volcanic islands are home to fascinating creatures found nowhere else on Earth, including marine iguanas, giant tortoises, flightless cormorants, and a diverse variety of finches. Darwin noted that although all of the islands shared similar volcanic compositions, environment, and climate, each isolated isle was home to its own set of unique species. Darwin suspected that these species had adapted to a unique diet and the microenvironment of their locale.

Galapagos, flying out of Baltra on the right with the Island of Santa Cruz on the left and in the middle is the Itabaca Channel

Waved Albatross, also referred as Galapagos Albatross ( Phoebastria irrorata ). Espanola Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador endemic

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Site : Galápagos Islands
Location : Ecuador
Year Designated : 1978
Category : Natural
Criteria : (vii)(viii)(ix)(x)
Reason : This “living laboratory” of evolution helped to inspire Charles Darwin 175 years ago and continues to offer a unique opportunity to explore a pristine natural ecosystem.

The Galápagos Islands are located 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the South American mainland but a world apart from anywhere else on Earth. The archipelago and its surrounding waters, located where three ocean currents converge, are famed for the unique animal species that piqued the interest of Charles Darwin in 1835. Decades later Darwin drew on his experiences here when penning his landmark theory of evolution by natural selection.

The actively volcanic islands are home to fascinating creatures found nowhere else on Earth, including marine iguanas, giant tortoises, flightless cormorants, and a diverse variety of finches. Darwin noted that although all of the islands shared similar volcanic compositions, environment, and climate, each isolated isle was home to its own set of unique species. Darwin suspected that these species had adapted to a unique diet and the microenvironment of their locale.

Galapagos, flying out of Baltra on the right with the Island of Santa Cruz on the left and in the middle is the Itabaca Channel

Waved Albatross, also referred as Galapagos Albatross ( Phoebastria irrorata ). Espanola Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador endemic

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Site : Galápagos Islands
Location : Ecuador
Year Designated : 1978
Category : Natural
Criteria : (vii)(viii)(ix)(x)
Reason : This “living laboratory” of evolution helped to inspire Charles Darwin 175 years ago and continues to offer a unique opportunity to explore a pristine natural ecosystem.

The Galápagos Islands are located 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the South American mainland but a world apart from anywhere else on Earth. The archipelago and its surrounding waters, located where three ocean currents converge, are famed for the unique animal species that piqued the interest of Charles Darwin in 1835. Decades later Darwin drew on his experiences here when penning his landmark theory of evolution by natural selection.

The actively volcanic islands are home to fascinating creatures found nowhere else on Earth, including marine iguanas, giant tortoises, flightless cormorants, and a diverse variety of finches. Darwin noted that although all of the islands shared similar volcanic compositions, environment, and climate, each isolated isle was home to its own set of unique species. Darwin suspected that these species had adapted to a unique diet and the microenvironment of their locale.

Galapagos, flying out of Baltra on the right with the Island of Santa Cruz on the left and in the middle is the Itabaca Channel

Waved Albatross, also referred as Galapagos Albatross ( Phoebastria irrorata ). Espanola Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador endemic

Site : Galápagos Islands
Location : Ecuador
Year Designated : 1978
Category : Natural
Criteria : (vii)(viii)(ix)(x)
Reason : This “living laboratory” of evolution helped to inspire Charles Darwin 175 years ago and continues to offer a unique opportunity to explore a pristine natural ecosystem.

The Galápagos Islands are located 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the South American mainland but a world apart from anywhere else on Earth. The archipelago and its surrounding waters, located where three ocean currents converge, are famed for the unique animal species that piqued the interest of Charles Darwin in 1835. Decades later Darwin drew on his experiences here when penning his landmark theory of evolution by natural selection.

The actively volcanic islands are home to fascinating creatures found nowhere else on Earth, including marine iguanas, giant tortoises, flightless cormorants, and a diverse variety of finches. Darwin noted that although all of the islands shared similar volcanic compositions, environment, and climate, each isolated isle was home to its own set of unique species. Darwin suspected that these species had adapted to a unique diet and the microenvironment of their locale.

The Galápagos Islands travel - Lonely Planet


Sustainable Travel Tours & Education | Galapagos.com

Posted by 2018 article

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