Sheri Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard College, is the author of “The Primacy of Politics: Social Democracy and the Making of Europe’s Twentieth Century.”

Sheri Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard College, is the author of “The Primacy of Politics: Social Democracy and the Making of Europe’s Twentieth Century.”

Subsequent events would appear to support this hypothesis. Unmoved by bribes, D’Annunzio eventually ‘declared war’ on Italy. Hostilities were short-lived, however. A bombardment on Christmas Eve 1920, in which D’Annunzio himself suffered an injury, finally brought his burlesque regime to an ignominious end. Nevertheless, having obtained a largely bloodless victory, the authorities in Rome granted a general amnesty to the defeated garrison. D’Annunzio himself remained in Fiume for some weeks to recuperate, from whence, amidst widespread rumours that he was destined for Ireland or some other troubled part of the British Empire, he retreated to his villa on the shores of Lake Garda.

Unfortunately for D’Annunzio and Gavan Duffy—and one must suspect for Mussolini and the Italian government also—this suggestion was not taken up by a cautious President de Valera. Revealing that he harboured unconventional plans of his own about how best to subvert the British Empire, de Valera instead invited D’Annunzio to try his luck in Soviet Moscow, and from there to march on an unsuspecting India!

Further reading
L. Hughes-Hallett, The Pike: Gabriele D’Annunzio; poet, seducer and preacher of war (London, 2013).
M. Ledeen, The First Duce: D’Annunzio at Fiume (London & Baltimore, 1977).
J. Woodhouse, Gabriele D’Annunzio: defiant archangel (New York, 2001).

Sheri Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard College, is the author of “The Primacy of Politics: Social Democracy and the Making of Europe’s Twentieth Century.”

Subsequent events would appear to support this hypothesis. Unmoved by bribes, D’Annunzio eventually ‘declared war’ on Italy. Hostilities were short-lived, however. A bombardment on Christmas Eve 1920, in which D’Annunzio himself suffered an injury, finally brought his burlesque regime to an ignominious end. Nevertheless, having obtained a largely bloodless victory, the authorities in Rome granted a general amnesty to the defeated garrison. D’Annunzio himself remained in Fiume for some weeks to recuperate, from whence, amidst widespread rumours that he was destined for Ireland or some other troubled part of the British Empire, he retreated to his villa on the shores of Lake Garda.

Unfortunately for D’Annunzio and Gavan Duffy—and one must suspect for Mussolini and the Italian government also—this suggestion was not taken up by a cautious President de Valera. Revealing that he harboured unconventional plans of his own about how best to subvert the British Empire, de Valera instead invited D’Annunzio to try his luck in Soviet Moscow, and from there to march on an unsuspecting India!

Further reading
L. Hughes-Hallett, The Pike: Gabriele D’Annunzio; poet, seducer and preacher of war (London, 2013).
M. Ledeen, The First Duce: D’Annunzio at Fiume (London & Baltimore, 1977).
J. Woodhouse, Gabriele D’Annunzio: defiant archangel (New York, 2001).

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Sheri Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard College, is the author of “The Primacy of Politics: Social Democracy and the Making of Europe’s Twentieth Century.”

Subsequent events would appear to support this hypothesis. Unmoved by bribes, D’Annunzio eventually ‘declared war’ on Italy. Hostilities were short-lived, however. A bombardment on Christmas Eve 1920, in which D’Annunzio himself suffered an injury, finally brought his burlesque regime to an ignominious end. Nevertheless, having obtained a largely bloodless victory, the authorities in Rome granted a general amnesty to the defeated garrison. D’Annunzio himself remained in Fiume for some weeks to recuperate, from whence, amidst widespread rumours that he was destined for Ireland or some other troubled part of the British Empire, he retreated to his villa on the shores of Lake Garda.

Unfortunately for D’Annunzio and Gavan Duffy—and one must suspect for Mussolini and the Italian government also—this suggestion was not taken up by a cautious President de Valera. Revealing that he harboured unconventional plans of his own about how best to subvert the British Empire, de Valera instead invited D’Annunzio to try his luck in Soviet Moscow, and from there to march on an unsuspecting India!

Further reading
L. Hughes-Hallett, The Pike: Gabriele D’Annunzio; poet, seducer and preacher of war (London, 2013).
M. Ledeen, The First Duce: D’Annunzio at Fiume (London & Baltimore, 1977).
J. Woodhouse, Gabriele D’Annunzio: defiant archangel (New York, 2001).

Keep abreast of significant corporate, financial and political developments around the world. Stay informed and spot emerging risks and opportunities with independent global reporting, expert commentary and analysis you can trust.

Gabriele D Annunzio | Italian writer and political leader.


The Pike: Gabriele D Annunzio – Poet, Seducer & Preacher.

Posted by 2018 article

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