A big problem that can shorten the life of a transmission is overheating , so it’s up to you to make sure it doesn’t happen. It is estimated that around 90% of automatic transmission failures are caused by transmission overheating alone , and the main reason transmissions overheat is because of overworked transmission fluid. Fluid that has outlived its usefulness or has to work in high heat is less efficient at providing the many functions it was intended for, such as lubrication, fluid pressure, and cooling. Heat and age are mainly what causes transmission fluid to degrade, and this only leads to more overheating.

The ideal range for fluid temperature is between 175 and 225 degrees, and every 20 degree drop in fluid temperature can help to double the life of your transmission. But there’s no way to tell how hot a transmission is you might say, or is there? Actually there is, and that’s exactly what a transmission temperature gauge is for.

Installing a transmission temp gauge as well as a dedicated transmission cooler are the best ways to prevent overheating. With a temperature gauge, you’ll be able to keep track of the transmission’s operating temperature by measuring the transmission fluid’s temperature. This will give you vital signs of when you’re working your transmission too hard, and can warn you when excessive heat is possibly ruining the transmission fluid or damaging the transmission. This could potentially save you from costly repairs in the future and ensures that your transmission is working at peak efficiency.

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Around 90% of all automatic transmission failures are caused by transmission overheating, so this isn’t something to be taken lightly. Overheating can almost always tell you what’s wrong with your transmission, which is that there’s something wrong with the transmission fluid. Transmission fluid is the lifeblood of your transmission, providing crucial functions such as cooling to lubrication to fluid pressure and more . Without enough transmission fluid or effective fluid, your transmission will start acting out.

That’s why we recommend installing a transmission cooler to help fluids stay at a comfortable temperature. You should also use  Lubegard Automatic Transmission Protectant  whenever you change the fluid as it can reduce the elevated operating temperatures by up to 40°F.

Burnt or ineffective fluid –  Burnt or ineffective fluid are the most common signs of transmission overheating. If the fluid gives off a burning smell then it’s high time you get it drained and changed. Ineffective fluid can be identified by contaminants in the fluid, loss of fluid viscosity, or a dark brown color. You should also consider synthetic fluids as they last much longer and are more resistant to cold and wear.

A big problem that can shorten the life of a transmission is overheating , so it’s up to you to make sure it doesn’t happen. It is estimated that around 90% of automatic transmission failures are caused by transmission overheating alone , and the main reason transmissions overheat is because of overworked transmission fluid. Fluid that has outlived its usefulness or has to work in high heat is less efficient at providing the many functions it was intended for, such as lubrication, fluid pressure, and cooling. Heat and age are mainly what causes transmission fluid to degrade, and this only leads to more overheating.

The ideal range for fluid temperature is between 175 and 225 degrees, and every 20 degree drop in fluid temperature can help to double the life of your transmission. But there’s no way to tell how hot a transmission is you might say, or is there? Actually there is, and that’s exactly what a transmission temperature gauge is for.

Installing a transmission temp gauge as well as a dedicated transmission cooler are the best ways to prevent overheating. With a temperature gauge, you’ll be able to keep track of the transmission’s operating temperature by measuring the transmission fluid’s temperature. This will give you vital signs of when you’re working your transmission too hard, and can warn you when excessive heat is possibly ruining the transmission fluid or damaging the transmission. This could potentially save you from costly repairs in the future and ensures that your transmission is working at peak efficiency.

A big problem that can shorten the life of a transmission is overheating , so it’s up to you to make sure it doesn’t happen. It is estimated that around 90% of automatic transmission failures are caused by transmission overheating alone , and the main reason transmissions overheat is because of overworked transmission fluid. Fluid that has outlived its usefulness or has to work in high heat is less efficient at providing the many functions it was intended for, such as lubrication, fluid pressure, and cooling. Heat and age are mainly what causes transmission fluid to degrade, and this only leads to more overheating.

The ideal range for fluid temperature is between 175 and 225 degrees, and every 20 degree drop in fluid temperature can help to double the life of your transmission. But there’s no way to tell how hot a transmission is you might say, or is there? Actually there is, and that’s exactly what a transmission temperature gauge is for.

Installing a transmission temp gauge as well as a dedicated transmission cooler are the best ways to prevent overheating. With a temperature gauge, you’ll be able to keep track of the transmission’s operating temperature by measuring the transmission fluid’s temperature. This will give you vital signs of when you’re working your transmission too hard, and can warn you when excessive heat is possibly ruining the transmission fluid or damaging the transmission. This could potentially save you from costly repairs in the future and ensures that your transmission is working at peak efficiency.

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TRANSMISSION OF HEAT - Antimatter


Transmission of heat (ppt) - SlideShare

Posted by 2018 article

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