This year marks the 100 th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915. Anzac Day goes beyond the landing, and is the day we remember the Australians who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.

The Memorial is interested in how the anniversary will be commemorated in Australia and around the world, and we have a couple of online activities planned to mark this significant moment in history: a digital record of the day, and the sharing, on our website, of a selection of social media posts. 

On our home page, you will be able to see a large selection of posts including #AnzacDay from accounts on Twitter and Instagram which should give everyone a glimpse of the many services, marches, ceremonies and events, large and small being held, as well as a sense of the more personal reflections which people may share on this day.

Geoffrey Treacher Grant was a brave young soldier of World War 1 who died doing something he thought was honourable: protecting the Australian land for king and country.

Geoffrey is buried in an unmarked grave, and his death has been commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, with his name and rank being one of 3,268 Australians and 456 New Zealanders who were all killed in the battles at Gallipoli. As well as the men and women who are buried mainly in unmarked graves, the memorial also commemorates the 960 Australians and 252 New Zealanders who were buried at sea.

The battles at Gallipoli were a defining moment in Australia’s history because it taught Australians that we should be our own country and fight for ourselves.

The "martyrs" of the Çanakkale battle, where thousands of Ottoman Turkish troops and Allied soldiers were killed during World War I, were remembered in ceremonies yesterday. The ceremonies were also attended by representatives of the countries that dispatched soldiers to fight Turkish troops 102 years ago.

The ceremonies were wrapped up with visitors laying wreaths and flowers on the graves of the Ottoman troops and Allied soldiers that died during the land campaign.

In separate events, visitors from Australia and New Zealand whose Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) troops fought in the Çanakkale campaign, will attend remembrance ceremonies for the fallen early Tuesday.

This year marks the 100 th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915. Anzac Day goes beyond the landing, and is the day we remember the Australians who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.

The Memorial is interested in how the anniversary will be commemorated in Australia and around the world, and we have a couple of online activities planned to mark this significant moment in history: a digital record of the day, and the sharing, on our website, of a selection of social media posts. 

On our home page, you will be able to see a large selection of posts including #AnzacDay from accounts on Twitter and Instagram which should give everyone a glimpse of the many services, marches, ceremonies and events, large and small being held, as well as a sense of the more personal reflections which people may share on this day.

Geoffrey Treacher Grant was a brave young soldier of World War 1 who died doing something he thought was honourable: protecting the Australian land for king and country.

Geoffrey is buried in an unmarked grave, and his death has been commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, with his name and rank being one of 3,268 Australians and 456 New Zealanders who were all killed in the battles at Gallipoli. As well as the men and women who are buried mainly in unmarked graves, the memorial also commemorates the 960 Australians and 252 New Zealanders who were buried at sea.

The battles at Gallipoli were a defining moment in Australia’s history because it taught Australians that we should be our own country and fight for ourselves.

The "martyrs" of the Çanakkale battle, where thousands of Ottoman Turkish troops and Allied soldiers were killed during World War I, were remembered in ceremonies yesterday. The ceremonies were also attended by representatives of the countries that dispatched soldiers to fight Turkish troops 102 years ago.

The ceremonies were wrapped up with visitors laying wreaths and flowers on the graves of the Ottoman troops and Allied soldiers that died during the land campaign.

In separate events, visitors from Australia and New Zealand whose Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) troops fought in the Çanakkale campaign, will attend remembrance ceremonies for the fallen early Tuesday.

It was on March 18, 1915, that a joint British-French naval force made it way to the Dardanelles Straits separating Europe from Asia in a bid to take Istanbul, then known as Constantinople.

Support from Australian and New Zealander troops backed by Indian, Canadian and some Maltese forces were not far behind and were finalising preparations for a then only potential assault. It was the failure of the naval campaign that prompted the disastrous land assault.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan kicked off an extensive program of commemoration events, describing the battle which would last nine months with tens of thousands dead on both sides as “a turning point”.

This year marks the 100 th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915. Anzac Day goes beyond the landing, and is the day we remember the Australians who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.

The Memorial is interested in how the anniversary will be commemorated in Australia and around the world, and we have a couple of online activities planned to mark this significant moment in history: a digital record of the day, and the sharing, on our website, of a selection of social media posts. 

On our home page, you will be able to see a large selection of posts including #AnzacDay from accounts on Twitter and Instagram which should give everyone a glimpse of the many services, marches, ceremonies and events, large and small being held, as well as a sense of the more personal reflections which people may share on this day.

Geoffrey Treacher Grant was a brave young soldier of World War 1 who died doing something he thought was honourable: protecting the Australian land for king and country.

Geoffrey is buried in an unmarked grave, and his death has been commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, with his name and rank being one of 3,268 Australians and 456 New Zealanders who were all killed in the battles at Gallipoli. As well as the men and women who are buried mainly in unmarked graves, the memorial also commemorates the 960 Australians and 252 New Zealanders who were buried at sea.

The battles at Gallipoli were a defining moment in Australia’s history because it taught Australians that we should be our own country and fight for ourselves.

This year marks the 100 th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915. Anzac Day goes beyond the landing, and is the day we remember the Australians who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.

The Memorial is interested in how the anniversary will be commemorated in Australia and around the world, and we have a couple of online activities planned to mark this significant moment in history: a digital record of the day, and the sharing, on our website, of a selection of social media posts. 

On our home page, you will be able to see a large selection of posts including #AnzacDay from accounts on Twitter and Instagram which should give everyone a glimpse of the many services, marches, ceremonies and events, large and small being held, as well as a sense of the more personal reflections which people may share on this day.

Commemorating Gallipoli - The HMS M.33 Project - YouTube


Commemorating Gallipoli through Music (ebook) by John.

Posted by 2018 article

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