Latin words of the first declension have an invariable stem and are generally of feminine gender. The predominant letter in the ending forms of this declension is a . The nominative singular form consists of the stem and the suffix -a , and the genitive singular form is the stem plus -ae .

There is a small category of masculine exceptions, which generally refer to occupations. These include 'farmer' ( agricola, agricolae masc.), 'sailor' ( nauta, nautae masc.), 'charioteer' ( aurīga, aurīgae masc.), 'inhabitant' ( incola, incolae masc.), 'pirate' ( pīrāta, pīrātae masc.), 'writer' ( scrība, scrībae masc.), and 'poet' ( poēta, poētae masc).

The first declension also holds three types of Greek nouns, derived from Ancient Greek's Alpha Declension . They are declined irregularly in the singular. Occasionally, these Greek nouns may be declined as if they were native Latin nouns, e.g. nominative athlēta may be used instead of the original athlētēs .

Latin words of the first declension have an invariable stem and are generally of feminine gender. The predominant letter in the ending forms of this declension is a . The nominative singular form consists of the stem and the suffix -a , and the genitive singular form is the stem plus -ae .

There is a small category of masculine exceptions, which generally refer to occupations. These include 'farmer' ( agricola, agricolae masc.), 'sailor' ( nauta, nautae masc.), 'charioteer' ( aurīga, aurīgae masc.), 'inhabitant' ( incola, incolae masc.), 'pirate' ( pīrāta, pīrātae masc.), 'writer' ( scrība, scrībae masc.), and 'poet' ( poēta, poētae masc).

The first declension also holds three types of Greek nouns, derived from Ancient Greek's Alpha Declension . They are declined irregularly in the singular. Occasionally, these Greek nouns may be declined as if they were native Latin nouns, e.g. nominative athlēta may be used instead of the original athlētēs .

As the title of this page suggests, English does not descend from either Latin or Greek. There is no sense in which you can "trace English back to" either Latin or Greek; genealogically, these two languages are like very distant great-great aunts or uncles of English.

Nevertheless, a large percentage of modern English vocabulary comes from classical Latin and Greek--which accounts for the common misperception that Latin and Greek are somehow "earlier" versions of English. Today's page will attempt to account for the Latin and Greek elements of English. And, since those elements are so important, particularly in "learned" (academic, scientific, professional) English, it's worth knowing something about the history of Latin and Greek, in order to place the development of English in its European context.

The basic reason for the many Latin and Greek words in modern English is that in their own time, the classical versions of these languages were, like English today, international languages with a dominant effect on the educational systems and culture of the rest of their world. Just as it's hard to think of a world language today escaping at least some influence from English, so it's hard to think of any western European language that has evaded the influence of Latin and Greek at some time in its past. (Remember that at some time in their past, all the modern Romance languages were Latin.)

Latin words of the first declension have an invariable stem and are generally of feminine gender. The predominant letter in the ending forms of this declension is a . The nominative singular form consists of the stem and the suffix -a , and the genitive singular form is the stem plus -ae .

There is a small category of masculine exceptions, which generally refer to occupations. These include 'farmer' ( agricola, agricolae masc.), 'sailor' ( nauta, nautae masc.), 'charioteer' ( aurīga, aurīgae masc.), 'inhabitant' ( incola, incolae masc.), 'pirate' ( pīrāta, pīrātae masc.), 'writer' ( scrība, scrībae masc.), and 'poet' ( poēta, poētae masc).

The first declension also holds three types of Greek nouns, derived from Ancient Greek's Alpha Declension . They are declined irregularly in the singular. Occasionally, these Greek nouns may be declined as if they were native Latin nouns, e.g. nominative athlēta may be used instead of the original athlētēs .

As the title of this page suggests, English does not descend from either Latin or Greek. There is no sense in which you can "trace English back to" either Latin or Greek; genealogically, these two languages are like very distant great-great aunts or uncles of English.

Nevertheless, a large percentage of modern English vocabulary comes from classical Latin and Greek--which accounts for the common misperception that Latin and Greek are somehow "earlier" versions of English. Today's page will attempt to account for the Latin and Greek elements of English. And, since those elements are so important, particularly in "learned" (academic, scientific, professional) English, it's worth knowing something about the history of Latin and Greek, in order to place the development of English in its European context.

The basic reason for the many Latin and Greek words in modern English is that in their own time, the classical versions of these languages were, like English today, international languages with a dominant effect on the educational systems and culture of the rest of their world. Just as it's hard to think of a world language today escaping at least some influence from English, so it's hard to think of any western European language that has evaded the influence of Latin and Greek at some time in its past. (Remember that at some time in their past, all the modern Romance languages were Latin.)

Read a substantial selection of Latin literature with great attention to grammatical detail.

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List of Greek and Latin roots in English - Wikipedia

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