Thank you for visiting navy.com – the official recruitment site of America's Navy. We have recently made technological updates to our site in an effort to provide a better interactive experience. To enjoy the best possible experience, we recommend that you consider upgrading to one of the following versions (or higher) of any of these popular browsers:

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

Thank you for visiting navy.com – the official recruitment site of America's Navy. We have recently made technological updates to our site in an effort to provide a better interactive experience. To enjoy the best possible experience, we recommend that you consider upgrading to one of the following versions (or higher) of any of these popular browsers:

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

A military chaplain ministers to military personnel and, in most cases, their families and civilians working for the military . In some cases they will also work with local civilians within a military area of operations.

Although the term chaplain originally had Christian roots, [1] it is generally used today in military organizations to describe all professionals specially trained to serve any spiritual need, regardless of religious affiliation. In addition to offering pastoral care to individuals, and supporting their religious rights and needs, military chaplains may also advise the executive on issues of religion, and ethics , morale and morals as affected by religion. They may also liaise with local religious leaders in an effort to understand the role of religion as both a factor in hostility and war and as a force for reconciliation and peace. [2]

Military chaplains normally represent a religion or faith group but work with military personnel of all faiths and none. Some countries, like the Netherlands and Belgium, [3] also employ humanist chaplains who offer a non-religious approach to chaplain support.

Thank you for visiting navy.com – the official recruitment site of America's Navy. We have recently made technological updates to our site in an effort to provide a better interactive experience. To enjoy the best possible experience, we recommend that you consider upgrading to one of the following versions (or higher) of any of these popular browsers:

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

A military chaplain ministers to military personnel and, in most cases, their families and civilians working for the military . In some cases they will also work with local civilians within a military area of operations.

Although the term chaplain originally had Christian roots, [1] it is generally used today in military organizations to describe all professionals specially trained to serve any spiritual need, regardless of religious affiliation. In addition to offering pastoral care to individuals, and supporting their religious rights and needs, military chaplains may also advise the executive on issues of religion, and ethics , morale and morals as affected by religion. They may also liaise with local religious leaders in an effort to understand the role of religion as both a factor in hostility and war and as a force for reconciliation and peace. [2]

Military chaplains normally represent a religion or faith group but work with military personnel of all faiths and none. Some countries, like the Netherlands and Belgium, [3] also employ humanist chaplains who offer a non-religious approach to chaplain support.

Serving as a military chaplain is a little bit different than working as a chaplain in other areas. Generally, chaplain is the term used for those who provide religious services and counsel in areas such as hospitals, prisons, police stations, and universities. However, while that is what a military chaplain does on a regular basis, they also have a few extra duties. These chaplains are more than just ordained ministers, too—they’re formal commissioned military staff officers in the United States Chaplain Corps. The Corps is broken down into three branches: the Army, the Navy (which includes the Marines, Merchant Marines, and Coast Guards), and the Air Force.

In addition to providing religious services and rites to military personnel on base, on ship, or on active duty in other countries, military chaplains may also need to serve as advisors to the executive officers of their unit. They will provide advice on issues related to religion, ethics, and morals. Military chaplains are often active within their own church communities and leadership structure, especially in areas where war, religion, and peace are discussed.

While an officer in the Chaplain Corps, military chaplains are considered non-combatants. This means that they may not participate in hostilities, combat, or any direct mission where combat may occur. In fact, the U.S. prohibits chaplains from carrying weapons in the field, although they may participate in marksman courses and competitions. Chaplains enjoy special status as outlined by the Geneva Conventions—if captured, they must immediately be returned to their home country unless they elect to stay and minister to other prisoners. They are never to be considered a prisoner of war. Even those who elect to stay and minister to prisoners must be treated well and with respect.

Thank you for visiting navy.com – the official recruitment site of America's Navy. We have recently made technological updates to our site in an effort to provide a better interactive experience. To enjoy the best possible experience, we recommend that you consider upgrading to one of the following versions (or higher) of any of these popular browsers:

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

A military chaplain ministers to military personnel and, in most cases, their families and civilians working for the military . In some cases they will also work with local civilians within a military area of operations.

Although the term chaplain originally had Christian roots, [1] it is generally used today in military organizations to describe all professionals specially trained to serve any spiritual need, regardless of religious affiliation. In addition to offering pastoral care to individuals, and supporting their religious rights and needs, military chaplains may also advise the executive on issues of religion, and ethics , morale and morals as affected by religion. They may also liaise with local religious leaders in an effort to understand the role of religion as both a factor in hostility and war and as a force for reconciliation and peace. [2]

Military chaplains normally represent a religion or faith group but work with military personnel of all faiths and none. Some countries, like the Netherlands and Belgium, [3] also employ humanist chaplains who offer a non-religious approach to chaplain support.

Serving as a military chaplain is a little bit different than working as a chaplain in other areas. Generally, chaplain is the term used for those who provide religious services and counsel in areas such as hospitals, prisons, police stations, and universities. However, while that is what a military chaplain does on a regular basis, they also have a few extra duties. These chaplains are more than just ordained ministers, too—they’re formal commissioned military staff officers in the United States Chaplain Corps. The Corps is broken down into three branches: the Army, the Navy (which includes the Marines, Merchant Marines, and Coast Guards), and the Air Force.

In addition to providing religious services and rites to military personnel on base, on ship, or on active duty in other countries, military chaplains may also need to serve as advisors to the executive officers of their unit. They will provide advice on issues related to religion, ethics, and morals. Military chaplains are often active within their own church communities and leadership structure, especially in areas where war, religion, and peace are discussed.

While an officer in the Chaplain Corps, military chaplains are considered non-combatants. This means that they may not participate in hostilities, combat, or any direct mission where combat may occur. In fact, the U.S. prohibits chaplains from carrying weapons in the field, although they may participate in marksman courses and competitions. Chaplains enjoy special status as outlined by the Geneva Conventions—if captured, they must immediately be returned to their home country unless they elect to stay and minister to other prisoners. They are never to be considered a prisoner of war. Even those who elect to stay and minister to prisoners must be treated well and with respect.

CHAPLAINS is a new 2-hour documentary film that takes the viewer into the dynamic world of chaplains – men and women who represent their own particular faith tradition but are trained to be of comfort and support to everyone – religious or not.


With a tradition dating back centuries, chaplains today are on the front lines – often in the midst of life and death situations – where the questions are the deepest and the need for spiritual and pastoral care the greatest.

Father Paul Hurley is a US Army Colonel and Catholic priest who serves the troops as senior chaplain in Afghanistan. His story confronts the larger questions about God and war, faith and freedom and the price to be paid.

Army Chaplain Corps | goarmy.com


United States military chaplains - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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