The stocking frame was a mechanical weft-knitting knitting machine used in the textiles industry. It was invented by William Lee of Calverton near Nottingham in 1589. Framework knitting, was the first major stage in the mechanisation of the textile industry at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution . It was adapted to knit cotton, do ribbing and by 1800, with the introduction of dividers (divider bar) as a lace making machine.

Bobbinet machines were invented in 1808 by John Heathcoat. He studied the hand movements of a Northamptonshire manual lace maker and reproduced them in the roller-locker machine. The 1809 version of this machine (patent no.3216) became known as the Old Loughborough , it was 18 inches (46 cm) wide and was designed for use with cotton. [1]

The stocking frame, invented in 1589 by Lee , consisted of a stout wooden frame. It did straight knitting not tubular knitting. It had a separate needle for each loop- these were low carbon steel bearded needles where the tips were reflexed and could be depressed onto a hollow closing the loop. The needle were supported on a needle bar that passed back and forth, to and from the operator. The beards were simultaneously depressed by a presser bar . The first machine had 8 needles per inch and was suitable for worsted: The next version had 16 needles per inch and was suitable for silk. [4]

The Crossover™ is a sturdy, reliable and easy to use tool. It is easy to store and can be transported, yet very robust in its design. Don’t forget to register your machine to activate your two year warranty (see warranty card included).

‘18’, the lower numbers are a general setting for thinner dies and materials, while the larger numbers open up the rollers for thicker materials and dies. We suggest you ‘make friends’ with your Crossover™ and you will quickly adjust to using the thumbwheel and will anticipate the correct settings for your projects.

INSTRUCTIONS SUGGESTED SETTINGS A wide number of materials can be used with Deep Dish Dies, some of which can cut several layers depending on the thickness. The ‘+’ symbol on the thumbwheel will position the rollers closer together, where the ‘-’ symbol will move them further apart. It is always best to experiment with your platform pressure by selecting a number, layering up the platform as instructed and feeding through the machine.

The Bobbinet machine is a plain-net lacemaking machine invented and patented by John Heathcoat in 1808 (patent no. 3151), and with a slight modification it was patented again in 1809 (patent no. 3216). This machine was known as the Old Loughborough . Heathcoat continued to improve his machine. There were many breaches of his patent. The 'Circular' was an improvement, designed in 1824, by William Morley (patent no.4921). As it gained ascendency, its distinctive name was dropped; it became the bobbinet and Heathcoats machíne the Old Loughborough.

Bobbinet tulle or genuine tulle is a specific type of tulle which has been made in the United Kingdom since the invention of the bobbinet machine . Heathcoat coined the term "bobbin net", or bobbinet as it is spelled today, to distinguish this machine-made tulle from the handmade " pillow lace ". Pillow lace, called so because of the pillow used to produce handmade bobbin lace . Machines based on his original designs are still in operation today producing fabrics in Perry Street, Chard, Somerset , UK.

The forerunner of bobbinet tulle was bobbin lace . Lace has been produced for a long time, made in tedious hand labour with thin thread and needles or bobbins. Bobbin lace is made by weaving the threads by moving the bobbins over or under each other. Much bobbin lace is based on a net ground. By the end of the 18th century, people tried to produce the net ground mechanically. In 1765 they managed to create a tulle-like fabric on a so-called stocking framework. It took, however, some more years until the first real tulle could be produced mechanically.

The stocking frame was a mechanical weft-knitting knitting machine used in the textiles industry. It was invented by William Lee of Calverton near Nottingham in 1589. Framework knitting, was the first major stage in the mechanisation of the textile industry at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution . It was adapted to knit cotton, do ribbing and by 1800, with the introduction of dividers (divider bar) as a lace making machine.

Bobbinet machines were invented in 1808 by John Heathcoat. He studied the hand movements of a Northamptonshire manual lace maker and reproduced them in the roller-locker machine. The 1809 version of this machine (patent no.3216) became known as the Old Loughborough , it was 18 inches (46 cm) wide and was designed for use with cotton. [1]

The stocking frame, invented in 1589 by Lee , consisted of a stout wooden frame. It did straight knitting not tubular knitting. It had a separate needle for each loop- these were low carbon steel bearded needles where the tips were reflexed and could be depressed onto a hollow closing the loop. The needle were supported on a needle bar that passed back and forth, to and from the operator. The beards were simultaneously depressed by a presser bar . The first machine had 8 needles per inch and was suitable for worsted: The next version had 16 needles per inch and was suitable for silk. [4]

The Crossover™ is a sturdy, reliable and easy to use tool. It is easy to store and can be transported, yet very robust in its design. Don’t forget to register your machine to activate your two year warranty (see warranty card included).

‘18’, the lower numbers are a general setting for thinner dies and materials, while the larger numbers open up the rollers for thicker materials and dies. We suggest you ‘make friends’ with your Crossover™ and you will quickly adjust to using the thumbwheel and will anticipate the correct settings for your projects.

INSTRUCTIONS SUGGESTED SETTINGS A wide number of materials can be used with Deep Dish Dies, some of which can cut several layers depending on the thickness. The ‘+’ symbol on the thumbwheel will position the rollers closer together, where the ‘-’ symbol will move them further apart. It is always best to experiment with your platform pressure by selecting a number, layering up the platform as instructed and feeding through the machine.

The stocking frame was a mechanical weft-knitting knitting machine used in the textiles industry. It was invented by William Lee of Calverton near Nottingham in 1589. Framework knitting, was the first major stage in the mechanisation of the textile industry at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution . It was adapted to knit cotton, do ribbing and by 1800, with the introduction of dividers (divider bar) as a lace making machine.

Bobbinet machines were invented in 1808 by John Heathcoat. He studied the hand movements of a Northamptonshire manual lace maker and reproduced them in the roller-locker machine. The 1809 version of this machine (patent no.3216) became known as the Old Loughborough , it was 18 inches (46 cm) wide and was designed for use with cotton. [1]

The stocking frame, invented in 1589 by Lee , consisted of a stout wooden frame. It did straight knitting not tubular knitting. It had a separate needle for each loop- these were low carbon steel bearded needles where the tips were reflexed and could be depressed onto a hollow closing the loop. The needle were supported on a needle bar that passed back and forth, to and from the operator. The beards were simultaneously depressed by a presser bar . The first machine had 8 needles per inch and was suitable for worsted: The next version had 16 needles per inch and was suitable for silk. [4]

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