The earliest examples of Christian missionary activity are those recorded in writings that would eventually come to form the New Testament . Early writings include the letters of Apostle Paul , written in the course of his missionary activity in Asia Minor and Greece . His activities were preceded by an expansion of Christianity from the first followers of Jesus in Jerusalem throughout Syro-Palestine . This is also described in the Acts of the Apostles .

From Late Antiquity onward, much missionary activity was carried out by members of religious orders . Monasteries followed disciplines and supported missions, libraries, and practical research, all of which were perceived as works to reduce human misery and suffering and glorify the Christian God. For example, Nestorian communities evangelized parts of Central Asia, as well as Tibet, China, and India. [2] Cistercians evangelized much of Northern Europe , as well as developing most of European agriculture's classic techniques. St Patrick evangelized many in Ireland. St David was active in Wales.

During the Middle Ages , Ramon Llull (c. 1232 – c. 1315) advanced the concept of preaching to Muslims and converting them to Christianity by means of non-violent argument. [3] A vision for large-scale mission to Muslims would die with him, not to be revived until the 19th Century.

Your own mission in life can be anything you pursue with almost religious enthusiasm. People with a mission—whether it's stopping drunk driving, keeping the town's public areas clean, increasing local recycling, or building a community center—very often succeed in really changing things.

New Latin, Medieval Latin, & Latin; New Latin mission-, missio religious mission, from Medieval Latin, task assigned, from Latin, act of sending, from mittere to send

Your own mission in life can be anything you pursue with almost religious enthusiasm. People with a mission—whether it's stopping drunk driving, keeping the town's public areas clean, increasing local recycling, or building a community center—very often succeed in really changing things.

The earliest examples of Christian missionary activity are those recorded in writings that would eventually come to form the New Testament . Early writings include the letters of Apostle Paul , written in the course of his missionary activity in Asia Minor and Greece . His activities were preceded by an expansion of Christianity from the first followers of Jesus in Jerusalem throughout Syro-Palestine . This is also described in the Acts of the Apostles .

From Late Antiquity onward, much missionary activity was carried out by members of religious orders . Monasteries followed disciplines and supported missions, libraries, and practical research, all of which were perceived as works to reduce human misery and suffering and glorify the Christian God. For example, Nestorian communities evangelized parts of Central Asia, as well as Tibet, China, and India. [2] Cistercians evangelized much of Northern Europe , as well as developing most of European agriculture's classic techniques. St Patrick evangelized many in Ireland. St David was active in Wales.

During the Middle Ages , Ramon Llull (c. 1232 – c. 1315) advanced the concept of preaching to Muslims and converting them to Christianity by means of non-violent argument. [3] A vision for large-scale mission to Muslims would die with him, not to be revived until the 19th Century.

Your own mission in life can be anything you pursue with almost religious enthusiasm. People with a mission—whether it's stopping drunk driving, keeping the town's public areas clean, increasing local recycling, or building a community center—very often succeed in really changing things.

New Latin, Medieval Latin, & Latin; New Latin mission-, missio religious mission, from Medieval Latin, task assigned, from Latin, act of sending, from mittere to send

Your own mission in life can be anything you pursue with almost religious enthusiasm. People with a mission—whether it's stopping drunk driving, keeping the town's public areas clean, increasing local recycling, or building a community center—very often succeed in really changing things.

Otto Skorzeny was one of Germany’s finest commandos. An engineer by profession, he tried to volunteer for the Luftwaffe (German Air Force), in the year 1939 but was declined entry due to his age (31 at the time) and unusual height (6.4 feet, or 1.92 meters). He had a scar on his cheek, inflicted during a fencing duel. Due to this wound, he would become known as ‘Scarface.’ He was an Austrian Nazi Party member since 1931 and was a noted figure in the lower and mid-level party structures before the war.

After failing to enlist as an airman, his party connections enabled him to become a member of Hitler’s elite bodyguard unit. After proving himself to be a capable soldier, most notably in the campaigns in Netherlands, France, and Yugoslavia, he advanced through the ranks and became a Lieutenant in the Waffen SS. He was wounded on the Eastern front and transferred to a desk job in Berlin, after which he got into the SS Foreign Intelligence Service.

Here he was given a chance to propose his ideas on commando warfare, studying the partisan methods he saw in the East. He advocated the use of a small force of saboteurs, kidnappers, and assassins to minimize the casualties and maximize the effect and create panic in the enemy. During the war, his name was associated with a string of operations, some of them largely successful, some of them not.

The earliest examples of Christian missionary activity are those recorded in writings that would eventually come to form the New Testament . Early writings include the letters of Apostle Paul , written in the course of his missionary activity in Asia Minor and Greece . His activities were preceded by an expansion of Christianity from the first followers of Jesus in Jerusalem throughout Syro-Palestine . This is also described in the Acts of the Apostles .

From Late Antiquity onward, much missionary activity was carried out by members of religious orders . Monasteries followed disciplines and supported missions, libraries, and practical research, all of which were perceived as works to reduce human misery and suffering and glorify the Christian God. For example, Nestorian communities evangelized parts of Central Asia, as well as Tibet, China, and India. [2] Cistercians evangelized much of Northern Europe , as well as developing most of European agriculture's classic techniques. St Patrick evangelized many in Ireland. St David was active in Wales.

During the Middle Ages , Ramon Llull (c. 1232 – c. 1315) advanced the concept of preaching to Muslims and converting them to Christianity by means of non-violent argument. [3] A vision for large-scale mission to Muslims would die with him, not to be revived until the 19th Century.

Successful Missions, Or, A History of. - Internet Archive


Successful Missions: Or, a History of the Missions.

Posted by 2018 article

41hJg9vt5JL