Just having a shell doesn’t explain the long-term success of the turtle and the tortoise, although it certainly sets them apart. As an order, called Testudinata or Testudines , they’re fascinating.

They live on every continent except Antarctica , survive in a wide variety of extreme environments, and eat unthinkable diets. Plus they’ve been doing it for longer than we’ve been around as a species.

Many species of tortoise thrive in some of the hottest deserts in the world. They escape from extreme temperatures , over 60 degrees Celsius (140 °F), by burrowing deep underground. With heat keeping them from exploring their already water-scarce environment, they have to be skilled at conservation to avoid shriveling up and dying.

For the most part, the terms "turtle" and "tortoise" are used to refer to the differences in where the animals live, and their adaptations to these environments, but the terms do not indicate a strict taxonomic separation. "Turtle" is often used for both turtles and tortoises.

The earliest known turtles date from 215 million years ago, making turtles one of the oldest reptile groups.  They’re even older than lizards and snakes! About 300 species are alive today, although some are highly endangered.

Tortoises have life spans comparable with that of humans; some are even known to have lived longer than 150 years or more!

Just having a shell doesn’t explain the long-term success of the turtle and the tortoise, although it certainly sets them apart. As an order, called Testudinata or Testudines , they’re fascinating.

They live on every continent except Antarctica , survive in a wide variety of extreme environments, and eat unthinkable diets. Plus they’ve been doing it for longer than we’ve been around as a species.

Many species of tortoise thrive in some of the hottest deserts in the world. They escape from extreme temperatures , over 60 degrees Celsius (140 °F), by burrowing deep underground. With heat keeping them from exploring their already water-scarce environment, they have to be skilled at conservation to avoid shriveling up and dying.

Just having a shell doesn’t explain the long-term success of the turtle and the tortoise, although it certainly sets them apart. As an order, called Testudinata or Testudines , they’re fascinating.

They live on every continent except Antarctica , survive in a wide variety of extreme environments, and eat unthinkable diets. Plus they’ve been doing it for longer than we’ve been around as a species.

Many species of tortoise thrive in some of the hottest deserts in the world. They escape from extreme temperatures , over 60 degrees Celsius (140 °F), by burrowing deep underground. With heat keeping them from exploring their already water-scarce environment, they have to be skilled at conservation to avoid shriveling up and dying.

For the most part, the terms "turtle" and "tortoise" are used to refer to the differences in where the animals live, and their adaptations to these environments, but the terms do not indicate a strict taxonomic separation. "Turtle" is often used for both turtles and tortoises.

The earliest known turtles date from 215 million years ago, making turtles one of the oldest reptile groups.  They’re even older than lizards and snakes! About 300 species are alive today, although some are highly endangered.

Tortoises have life spans comparable with that of humans; some are even known to have lived longer than 150 years or more!

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Turtles and tortoises are very popular as pets, but what should a potential owner expect from these interesting shelled creatures? They are cute, but are they cuddly? They have sharp mandibles, but will they bite? And can they be handled – and if so do they enjoy it? Just what can you expect in the way of interactions from your captive turtle or tortoise?

Actually, despite the fact that they are reptiles, collectively a grouping of animals both well-known for over-emoting, turtles and tortoises are rather responsive to the overtures of their keepers. Most species quickly equate the presence of a person with the probability of being fed, and once acclimated, will eagerly paddle or plod to a position where they can greet their keeper.

The first turtles and tortoises appeared during the Jurassic period , 157 million years ago; however, those developed from ancestors from the Triassic period, more than 200 million years ago.

Some prehistoric reptiles developed an exoskeleton in the shape of a shell covering their thorax, organs and ribs. This made it possible for some animals, such as turtles and tortoises, to develop a shell made of bone .

Do you want to know the differences between turtles and tortoises ? This AnimalWised article focuses on the evolutionary features that these precious reptiles have developed over time.

Just having a shell doesn’t explain the long-term success of the turtle and the tortoise, although it certainly sets them apart. As an order, called Testudinata or Testudines , they’re fascinating.

They live on every continent except Antarctica , survive in a wide variety of extreme environments, and eat unthinkable diets. Plus they’ve been doing it for longer than we’ve been around as a species.

Many species of tortoise thrive in some of the hottest deserts in the world. They escape from extreme temperatures , over 60 degrees Celsius (140 °F), by burrowing deep underground. With heat keeping them from exploring their already water-scarce environment, they have to be skilled at conservation to avoid shriveling up and dying.

For the most part, the terms "turtle" and "tortoise" are used to refer to the differences in where the animals live, and their adaptations to these environments, but the terms do not indicate a strict taxonomic separation. "Turtle" is often used for both turtles and tortoises.

The earliest known turtles date from 215 million years ago, making turtles one of the oldest reptile groups.  They’re even older than lizards and snakes! About 300 species are alive today, although some are highly endangered.

Tortoises have life spans comparable with that of humans; some are even known to have lived longer than 150 years or more!

Get the best of Petplace straight to your inbox. Expert Pet Health and Wellness Info. Top Pet and Emergency Care Tips. Latest Pet Product Recalls and Much More.

Turtles and tortoises are very popular as pets, but what should a potential owner expect from these interesting shelled creatures? They are cute, but are they cuddly? They have sharp mandibles, but will they bite? And can they be handled – and if so do they enjoy it? Just what can you expect in the way of interactions from your captive turtle or tortoise?

Actually, despite the fact that they are reptiles, collectively a grouping of animals both well-known for over-emoting, turtles and tortoises are rather responsive to the overtures of their keepers. Most species quickly equate the presence of a person with the probability of being fed, and once acclimated, will eagerly paddle or plod to a position where they can greet their keeper.

Turtle vs Tortoise - Difference and Comparison | Diffen


Turtle - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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