The catalogue [ Note 1 ] has always been an important focus of library discussion; its construction and production are a central part of historical library practice and identity. In recent months, the future of the catalogue has become a major topic of debate, prompted by several new initiatives and by a growing sense that it has to evolve to meet user needs [ 1 ][ 2 ].

Much of the discussion is about improving the catalogue user's experience, not an unreasonable aspiration. However, we really need to put this in the context of a more far-reaching set of issues about discovery and about the continued evolution of library systems, including the catalogue, in a changing network environment. In this environment, users increasingly discover resources in places other than the catalogue.

This article takes a medium-term perspective and covers some issues that the further development of the catalogue, or the library discovery experience, poses. In the longer term, I think, we will see major changes in how libraries organise themselves to provide services, but coverage of that is outside my scope, and probably my competence, here. My purpose is to touch on some questions, not to provide any answers, as libraries continue to co-evolve with network behaviours and expectations.

A catalog number is the identification number a record label assigns to a release. It is used for tracking purposes by both the label and the distributor. It is composed of numbers and letters, and sometimes a symbol such as a hyphen. There is no standard length or nomenclature.

Catalog numbers are typically printed on the spine of a CD or DVD and on the back of record sleeves , but you sometimes you'll find them in other places on the artwork They might also be found on the CD and the info label on the record or inscribed on the disk itself.

If you generally buy your music digitally, you may never see the catalog number for a release. For example, the iTunes store does not list the catalog number for releases. They instead have their own ID numbers that are included in the URL to the item in the iTunes Store. Similarly, on Amazon.com you will see the ASIN number, but that is not the catalog number.

In the 1700s, the seeds of a new style of presenting works of art—both on the wall and on the page—were planted by a German prince.

I talked with Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute, about the prince and his story, which is told in the exhibition Display & Art History: The Düsseldorf Galley and Its Catalogue , closing Sunday. He explained how the bold ideas of an influential group of royal art collectors, patrons, and artists influenced how we experience and learn about art today.

German prince Johann Wilhelm II von der Pfalz lived in Düsseldorf, one of the principalities of what is now Germany. He was one of a number of “electors” who could vote for the Holy Roman Emperor. Electors competed with each other over their art collections and Prince Johann Wilhelm, along with his first and second wives, built an incredible collection of paintings. They were mostly Italian, Flemish, and Dutch works. To house them, he constructed one of the first independent galleries for displaying artworks.

This website uses cookies. Continuing to use this website gives consent to cookies being used. For more information see our  cookie policy .

From Old French catalogue , from Late Latin catalogus , itself from Ancient Greek κατάλογος ( katálogos , “ an enrollment, a register, a list, catalogue ” ) , from καταλέγω ( katalégō , “ to recount, to tell at length or in order, to make a list ” ) , from κατά ( katá , “ downwards, towards ” ) + λέγω ( légō , “ to gather, to pick up, to choose for oneself, to pick out, to count ” ) .

catalogue ( third-person singular simple present catalogues , present participle cataloguing , simple past and past participle catalogued )

From Late Latin catalogus , itself from Ancient Greek κατάλογος ( katálogos , “ an enrollment, a register, a list, catalogue ” ) , from καταλέγω ( katalégō , “ to recount, to tell at length or in order, to make a list ” ) , from κατά ( katá , “ downwards, towards ” ) + λέγω ( légō , “ to gather, to pick up, to choose for oneself, to pick out, to count ” ) .

The catalogue [ Note 1 ] has always been an important focus of library discussion; its construction and production are a central part of historical library practice and identity. In recent months, the future of the catalogue has become a major topic of debate, prompted by several new initiatives and by a growing sense that it has to evolve to meet user needs [ 1 ][ 2 ].

Much of the discussion is about improving the catalogue user's experience, not an unreasonable aspiration. However, we really need to put this in the context of a more far-reaching set of issues about discovery and about the continued evolution of library systems, including the catalogue, in a changing network environment. In this environment, users increasingly discover resources in places other than the catalogue.

This article takes a medium-term perspective and covers some issues that the further development of the catalogue, or the library discovery experience, poses. In the longer term, I think, we will see major changes in how libraries organise themselves to provide services, but coverage of that is outside my scope, and probably my competence, here. My purpose is to touch on some questions, not to provide any answers, as libraries continue to co-evolve with network behaviours and expectations.

A catalog number is the identification number a record label assigns to a release. It is used for tracking purposes by both the label and the distributor. It is composed of numbers and letters, and sometimes a symbol such as a hyphen. There is no standard length or nomenclature.

Catalog numbers are typically printed on the spine of a CD or DVD and on the back of record sleeves , but you sometimes you'll find them in other places on the artwork They might also be found on the CD and the info label on the record or inscribed on the disk itself.

If you generally buy your music digitally, you may never see the catalog number for a release. For example, the iTunes store does not list the catalog number for releases. They instead have their own ID numbers that are included in the URL to the item in the iTunes Store. Similarly, on Amazon.com you will see the ASIN number, but that is not the catalog number.

The catalogue [ Note 1 ] has always been an important focus of library discussion; its construction and production are a central part of historical library practice and identity. In recent months, the future of the catalogue has become a major topic of debate, prompted by several new initiatives and by a growing sense that it has to evolve to meet user needs [ 1 ][ 2 ].

Much of the discussion is about improving the catalogue user's experience, not an unreasonable aspiration. However, we really need to put this in the context of a more far-reaching set of issues about discovery and about the continued evolution of library systems, including the catalogue, in a changing network environment. In this environment, users increasingly discover resources in places other than the catalogue.

This article takes a medium-term perspective and covers some issues that the further development of the catalogue, or the library discovery experience, poses. In the longer term, I think, we will see major changes in how libraries organise themselves to provide services, but coverage of that is outside my scope, and probably my competence, here. My purpose is to touch on some questions, not to provide any answers, as libraries continue to co-evolve with network behaviours and expectations.

A catalog number is the identification number a record label assigns to a release. It is used for tracking purposes by both the label and the distributor. It is composed of numbers and letters, and sometimes a symbol such as a hyphen. There is no standard length or nomenclature.

Catalog numbers are typically printed on the spine of a CD or DVD and on the back of record sleeves , but you sometimes you'll find them in other places on the artwork They might also be found on the CD and the info label on the record or inscribed on the disk itself.

If you generally buy your music digitally, you may never see the catalog number for a release. For example, the iTunes store does not list the catalog number for releases. They instead have their own ID numbers that are included in the URL to the item in the iTunes Store. Similarly, on Amazon.com you will see the ASIN number, but that is not the catalog number.

In the 1700s, the seeds of a new style of presenting works of art—both on the wall and on the page—were planted by a German prince.

I talked with Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute, about the prince and his story, which is told in the exhibition Display & Art History: The Düsseldorf Galley and Its Catalogue , closing Sunday. He explained how the bold ideas of an influential group of royal art collectors, patrons, and artists influenced how we experience and learn about art today.

German prince Johann Wilhelm II von der Pfalz lived in Düsseldorf, one of the principalities of what is now Germany. He was one of a number of “electors” who could vote for the Holy Roman Emperor. Electors competed with each other over their art collections and Prince Johann Wilhelm, along with his first and second wives, built an incredible collection of paintings. They were mostly Italian, Flemish, and Dutch works. To house them, he constructed one of the first independent galleries for displaying artworks.

This website uses cookies. Continuing to use this website gives consent to cookies being used. For more information see our  cookie policy .

The catalogue [ Note 1 ] has always been an important focus of library discussion; its construction and production are a central part of historical library practice and identity. In recent months, the future of the catalogue has become a major topic of debate, prompted by several new initiatives and by a growing sense that it has to evolve to meet user needs [ 1 ][ 2 ].

Much of the discussion is about improving the catalogue user's experience, not an unreasonable aspiration. However, we really need to put this in the context of a more far-reaching set of issues about discovery and about the continued evolution of library systems, including the catalogue, in a changing network environment. In this environment, users increasingly discover resources in places other than the catalogue.

This article takes a medium-term perspective and covers some issues that the further development of the catalogue, or the library discovery experience, poses. In the longer term, I think, we will see major changes in how libraries organise themselves to provide services, but coverage of that is outside my scope, and probably my competence, here. My purpose is to touch on some questions, not to provide any answers, as libraries continue to co-evolve with network behaviours and expectations.

The catalogue [ Note 1 ] has always been an important focus of library discussion; its construction and production are a central part of historical library practice and identity. In recent months, the future of the catalogue has become a major topic of debate, prompted by several new initiatives and by a growing sense that it has to evolve to meet user needs [ 1 ][ 2 ].

Much of the discussion is about improving the catalogue user's experience, not an unreasonable aspiration. However, we really need to put this in the context of a more far-reaching set of issues about discovery and about the continued evolution of library systems, including the catalogue, in a changing network environment. In this environment, users increasingly discover resources in places other than the catalogue.

This article takes a medium-term perspective and covers some issues that the further development of the catalogue, or the library discovery experience, poses. In the longer term, I think, we will see major changes in how libraries organise themselves to provide services, but coverage of that is outside my scope, and probably my competence, here. My purpose is to touch on some questions, not to provide any answers, as libraries continue to co-evolve with network behaviours and expectations.

A catalog number is the identification number a record label assigns to a release. It is used for tracking purposes by both the label and the distributor. It is composed of numbers and letters, and sometimes a symbol such as a hyphen. There is no standard length or nomenclature.

Catalog numbers are typically printed on the spine of a CD or DVD and on the back of record sleeves , but you sometimes you'll find them in other places on the artwork They might also be found on the CD and the info label on the record or inscribed on the disk itself.

If you generally buy your music digitally, you may never see the catalog number for a release. For example, the iTunes store does not list the catalog number for releases. They instead have their own ID numbers that are included in the URL to the item in the iTunes Store. Similarly, on Amazon.com you will see the ASIN number, but that is not the catalog number.

In the 1700s, the seeds of a new style of presenting works of art—both on the wall and on the page—were planted by a German prince.

I talked with Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute, about the prince and his story, which is told in the exhibition Display & Art History: The Düsseldorf Galley and Its Catalogue , closing Sunday. He explained how the bold ideas of an influential group of royal art collectors, patrons, and artists influenced how we experience and learn about art today.

German prince Johann Wilhelm II von der Pfalz lived in Düsseldorf, one of the principalities of what is now Germany. He was one of a number of “electors” who could vote for the Holy Roman Emperor. Electors competed with each other over their art collections and Prince Johann Wilhelm, along with his first and second wives, built an incredible collection of paintings. They were mostly Italian, Flemish, and Dutch works. To house them, he constructed one of the first independent galleries for displaying artworks.

Learn About Catalog Numbers for CDs - The Balance


Library catalog - Wikipedia

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