The dusty steppes of economically depressed, physically ravaged post-Soviet Kazakhstan in the mid 1990s are no place to be a teenager in The Wounded Angel . After winning the Silver Bear in 2013 with his striking debut feature, Harmony Lessons , writer-director Emir Baigazin returns to Berlin with another melancholy portrait of corrupted youth. The four thematically linked stories don't quite measure up to the poetic impact of the more cohesive earlier work, but the drama is transfixing even when it's perplexing, every frame a composition of austere beauty.

Working this time with Belgian cinematographer Yves Cape (who shot Leos Carax's gloriously nuts cine-reverie, Holy Motors ), Baigazin has developed into an even more assured visual stylist. Camera movement is minimal, with action predominantly playing out within static shots. The framing shows an attention to detail and understanding of the descriptive power of spatial dynamics worthy of Douglas Sirk. Characters are constantly observed either through or against doorways and windows, in mirrors or along corridors, at other times shot from behind or captured in simple, eloquent close-ups. The gaze is detached, unblinking, bereft.

The settings are villages of humble stucco-walled, sparsely decorated houses surrounded by parched grassland and abandoned industry. The resources of the land have been sucked dry, and the shells of factories look like bomb sites. One amazing shot of a boy sitting on a rusted tangle of sheet metal looks like something Frank Gehry might have designed out of found materials. The idea of being exiled into darkness is enhanced by the government's economic measure of shutting off electricity every night at 9 p.m., creating a kind of candlelit curfew.

Born and raised in Germany, Lea Wülferth has been living and working in Brooklyn, NY since 2009, writing and making art under her name and the pseudonym L Peregrine. Inspired by themes of freedom, identity, memory, and truth, her work spans a spectrum from documenting and commenting on observed scenes and settings to abstract, surreal expressions in a range of visual media and the written word.

He was my teacher; I was 16, he was 26. From my classroom I would watch him arrive in his car before strutting across the playground to his own classroom. The seasons that year were marked by my observations of him each morning. I remember his warm breath in the cold air that autumn, those puffed clouds forced from his body in the dark mornings were evidence of his journey to his classroom. In the springtime the bright sunlight illuminated his blonde hair as if he was my own private deity. The summer gave me glimpses of his body that I rarely saw otherwise ...

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  • The dusty steppes of economically depressed, physically ravaged post-Soviet Kazakhstan in the mid 1990s are no place to be a teenager in The Wounded Angel . After winning the Silver Bear in 2013 with his striking debut feature, Harmony Lessons , writer-director Emir Baigazin returns to Berlin with another melancholy portrait of corrupted youth. The four thematically linked stories don't quite measure up to the poetic impact of the more cohesive earlier work, but the drama is transfixing even when it's perplexing, every frame a composition of austere beauty.

    Working this time with Belgian cinematographer Yves Cape (who shot Leos Carax's gloriously nuts cine-reverie, Holy Motors ), Baigazin has developed into an even more assured visual stylist. Camera movement is minimal, with action predominantly playing out within static shots. The framing shows an attention to detail and understanding of the descriptive power of spatial dynamics worthy of Douglas Sirk. Characters are constantly observed either through or against doorways and windows, in mirrors or along corridors, at other times shot from behind or captured in simple, eloquent close-ups. The gaze is detached, unblinking, bereft.

    The settings are villages of humble stucco-walled, sparsely decorated houses surrounded by parched grassland and abandoned industry. The resources of the land have been sucked dry, and the shells of factories look like bomb sites. One amazing shot of a boy sitting on a rusted tangle of sheet metal looks like something Frank Gehry might have designed out of found materials. The idea of being exiled into darkness is enhanced by the government's economic measure of shutting off electricity every night at 9 p.m., creating a kind of candlelit curfew.

    Born and raised in Germany, Lea Wülferth has been living and working in Brooklyn, NY since 2009, writing and making art under her name and the pseudonym L Peregrine. Inspired by themes of freedom, identity, memory, and truth, her work spans a spectrum from documenting and commenting on observed scenes and settings to abstract, surreal expressions in a range of visual media and the written word.

    He was my teacher; I was 16, he was 26. From my classroom I would watch him arrive in his car before strutting across the playground to his own classroom. The seasons that year were marked by my observations of him each morning. I remember his warm breath in the cold air that autumn, those puffed clouds forced from his body in the dark mornings were evidence of his journey to his classroom. In the springtime the bright sunlight illuminated his blonde hair as if he was my own private deity. The summer gave me glimpses of his body that I rarely saw otherwise ...

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    Wow..my god…where has all this been all these years it’s like u just jumped out of the closet..ur so so so talented..looks like Uve found ur thing…it’s beautiful in so many ways…so beautiful that it makes the sadness less painful.. Well done ur officially my fav poet

    it’s a little tear.. and I feel like dropping one after reading your posts.. they’re beautiful and heartbreaking…

    if the writer doesn’t shed a tear the reader won’t too. many times, as i am writing I cry myself. I am very happy the writing could get the feeling across. many thanks for visiting.

    The dusty steppes of economically depressed, physically ravaged post-Soviet Kazakhstan in the mid 1990s are no place to be a teenager in The Wounded Angel . After winning the Silver Bear in 2013 with his striking debut feature, Harmony Lessons , writer-director Emir Baigazin returns to Berlin with another melancholy portrait of corrupted youth. The four thematically linked stories don't quite measure up to the poetic impact of the more cohesive earlier work, but the drama is transfixing even when it's perplexing, every frame a composition of austere beauty.

    Working this time with Belgian cinematographer Yves Cape (who shot Leos Carax's gloriously nuts cine-reverie, Holy Motors ), Baigazin has developed into an even more assured visual stylist. Camera movement is minimal, with action predominantly playing out within static shots. The framing shows an attention to detail and understanding of the descriptive power of spatial dynamics worthy of Douglas Sirk. Characters are constantly observed either through or against doorways and windows, in mirrors or along corridors, at other times shot from behind or captured in simple, eloquent close-ups. The gaze is detached, unblinking, bereft.

    The settings are villages of humble stucco-walled, sparsely decorated houses surrounded by parched grassland and abandoned industry. The resources of the land have been sucked dry, and the shells of factories look like bomb sites. One amazing shot of a boy sitting on a rusted tangle of sheet metal looks like something Frank Gehry might have designed out of found materials. The idea of being exiled into darkness is enhanced by the government's economic measure of shutting off electricity every night at 9 p.m., creating a kind of candlelit curfew.

    Born and raised in Germany, Lea Wülferth has been living and working in Brooklyn, NY since 2009, writing and making art under her name and the pseudonym L Peregrine. Inspired by themes of freedom, identity, memory, and truth, her work spans a spectrum from documenting and commenting on observed scenes and settings to abstract, surreal expressions in a range of visual media and the written word.

    He was my teacher; I was 16, he was 26. From my classroom I would watch him arrive in his car before strutting across the playground to his own classroom. The seasons that year were marked by my observations of him each morning. I remember his warm breath in the cold air that autumn, those puffed clouds forced from his body in the dark mornings were evidence of his journey to his classroom. In the springtime the bright sunlight illuminated his blonde hair as if he was my own private deity. The summer gave me glimpses of his body that I rarely saw otherwise ...

  • A Wife by Ridhi
    (January 27, 2018)
  • My Path Runs Ahead Of Me And My Plans – Canto Six by Benjamin R Bray
    (January 27, 2018)
  • A Restless Cut by Rando Mithlo
    (January 27, 2018)
  • Yemen by TM Arko
    (January 27, 2018)
  • Auschwitz by Steve Pearson
    (January 27, 2018)
  • Reverberating Echos by Anne G
    (January 27, 2018)
  • Gypsy Of The Railways by Roger Turner
    (January 27, 2018)
  • Spotlight On Writers – Courtney Trowman aka CC Bella by Courtney Trowman aka CC Bella
    (January 27, 2018)
  • America by Spillwords
    (January 28, 2018)
  • Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

    The dusty steppes of economically depressed, physically ravaged post-Soviet Kazakhstan in the mid 1990s are no place to be a teenager in The Wounded Angel . After winning the Silver Bear in 2013 with his striking debut feature, Harmony Lessons , writer-director Emir Baigazin returns to Berlin with another melancholy portrait of corrupted youth. The four thematically linked stories don't quite measure up to the poetic impact of the more cohesive earlier work, but the drama is transfixing even when it's perplexing, every frame a composition of austere beauty.

    Working this time with Belgian cinematographer Yves Cape (who shot Leos Carax's gloriously nuts cine-reverie, Holy Motors ), Baigazin has developed into an even more assured visual stylist. Camera movement is minimal, with action predominantly playing out within static shots. The framing shows an attention to detail and understanding of the descriptive power of spatial dynamics worthy of Douglas Sirk. Characters are constantly observed either through or against doorways and windows, in mirrors or along corridors, at other times shot from behind or captured in simple, eloquent close-ups. The gaze is detached, unblinking, bereft.

    The settings are villages of humble stucco-walled, sparsely decorated houses surrounded by parched grassland and abandoned industry. The resources of the land have been sucked dry, and the shells of factories look like bomb sites. One amazing shot of a boy sitting on a rusted tangle of sheet metal looks like something Frank Gehry might have designed out of found materials. The idea of being exiled into darkness is enhanced by the government's economic measure of shutting off electricity every night at 9 p.m., creating a kind of candlelit curfew.

    A Wounded Angel: A collection of selected short stories.


    A Wounded Angel - Kindle edition by Richard Hurt.

    Posted by 2018 article

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