Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on April 1, 2014

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on April 1, 2014

Civilization was the product of the Agricultural Neolithic Revolution ; as H. G. Wells put it, "civilization was the agricultural surplus." [22] In the course of history, civilization coincided in space with fertile areas such as The Fertile Crescent , and states formed mainly in circumscribed agricultural lands . The Great Wall of China and the Roman empire's limes (borders) demarcated the same northern frontier of cereal agriculture. This cereal belt fed the civilizations formed in the Axial Age and connected by the Silk Road . [ citation needed ]

Ancient strategists, Chinese Guan Zhong [27] and Shang Yang [28] and Indian Kautilya , [29] drew doctrines linking agriculture with military power. Agriculture defined the limits on how large and for how long an army could be mobilized. Shang Yang called agriculture and war the One . [30] In the vast human pantheon of agricultural deities [31] there are several deities who combined the functions of agriculture and war. [32]

As the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution produced civilization, the modern Agricultural Revolution, begun in Britain ( British Agricultural Revolution ), made possible the industrial civilization . The first precondition for industry was greater yields by less manpower, resulting in greater percentage of manpower available for non-agricultural sectors. [33]

LONDON – 8 JUNE 2016  — The origins of over two-thirds of the grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and other agricultural crops countries grow and consume can be traced to ancient breadbaskets in distant parts of the world, according to an exhaustive peer-reviewed report published today.

The study , covering 151 crops and 177 countries, marks the first time scientists have quantified the level of interconnectedness of national diets and agricultural economies in terms of nonnative plants, providing a novel take on the global crop diaspora, and a deeper understanding of how globalization continues to affect what we eat. The findings also have important implications for efforts to make the global food supply more resilient to challenges such as climate change.

“It’s fascinating to see the extent to which so many plants have become synonymous with traditional diets in countries many thousands of miles from where those plants first appeared,” said lead author Colin Khoury of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and United States Department of Agriculture. “If you’re eating tomatoes in Italy or chillies in Thailand, you’re consuming foods that originated far away, and that have reached those places
relatively recently.

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on April 9, 2014

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on April 1, 2014

Civilization was the product of the Agricultural Neolithic Revolution ; as H. G. Wells put it, "civilization was the agricultural surplus." [22] In the course of history, civilization coincided in space with fertile areas such as The Fertile Crescent , and states formed mainly in circumscribed agricultural lands . The Great Wall of China and the Roman empire's limes (borders) demarcated the same northern frontier of cereal agriculture. This cereal belt fed the civilizations formed in the Axial Age and connected by the Silk Road . [ citation needed ]

Ancient strategists, Chinese Guan Zhong [27] and Shang Yang [28] and Indian Kautilya , [29] drew doctrines linking agriculture with military power. Agriculture defined the limits on how large and for how long an army could be mobilized. Shang Yang called agriculture and war the One . [30] In the vast human pantheon of agricultural deities [31] there are several deities who combined the functions of agriculture and war. [32]

As the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution produced civilization, the modern Agricultural Revolution, begun in Britain ( British Agricultural Revolution ), made possible the industrial civilization . The first precondition for industry was greater yields by less manpower, resulting in greater percentage of manpower available for non-agricultural sectors. [33]

LONDON – 8 JUNE 2016  — The origins of over two-thirds of the grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and other agricultural crops countries grow and consume can be traced to ancient breadbaskets in distant parts of the world, according to an exhaustive peer-reviewed report published today.

The study , covering 151 crops and 177 countries, marks the first time scientists have quantified the level of interconnectedness of national diets and agricultural economies in terms of nonnative plants, providing a novel take on the global crop diaspora, and a deeper understanding of how globalization continues to affect what we eat. The findings also have important implications for efforts to make the global food supply more resilient to challenges such as climate change.

“It’s fascinating to see the extent to which so many plants have become synonymous with traditional diets in countries many thousands of miles from where those plants first appeared,” said lead author Colin Khoury of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and United States Department of Agriculture. “If you’re eating tomatoes in Italy or chillies in Thailand, you’re consuming foods that originated far away, and that have reached those places
relatively recently.

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on April 1, 2014

Civilization was the product of the Agricultural Neolithic Revolution ; as H. G. Wells put it, "civilization was the agricultural surplus." [22] In the course of history, civilization coincided in space with fertile areas such as The Fertile Crescent , and states formed mainly in circumscribed agricultural lands . The Great Wall of China and the Roman empire's limes (borders) demarcated the same northern frontier of cereal agriculture. This cereal belt fed the civilizations formed in the Axial Age and connected by the Silk Road . [ citation needed ]

Ancient strategists, Chinese Guan Zhong [27] and Shang Yang [28] and Indian Kautilya , [29] drew doctrines linking agriculture with military power. Agriculture defined the limits on how large and for how long an army could be mobilized. Shang Yang called agriculture and war the One . [30] In the vast human pantheon of agricultural deities [31] there are several deities who combined the functions of agriculture and war. [32]

As the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution produced civilization, the modern Agricultural Revolution, begun in Britain ( British Agricultural Revolution ), made possible the industrial civilization . The first precondition for industry was greater yields by less manpower, resulting in greater percentage of manpower available for non-agricultural sectors. [33]

Foreign Crops and Markets, Vol. 26 - United States.


Foreign crops and markets in SearchWorks catalog

Posted by 2018 article

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