Moon Knight ( Marc Spector ) is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics . Created by Doug Moench and Don Perlin , the character first appeared in Werewolf by Night #32 (August 1975).

Moon Knight then gained a backup strip in Hulk! Magazine #11–15, #17–18, and #20, which saw the character first drawn with artist Bill Sienkiewicz on issues #13-15, 17-18, and #20 as well as a black and white story in the magazine publication Marvel Preview #21. Sienkiewicz's eclectic art style helped shed the early perception of Moon Knight as a mere Batman clone. [2] The Hulk backups and Marvel Preview issue, which were all written by Doug Moench, provided Moon Knight with a partial origin story and introduced one of his most notable recurring villains: Randall Spector, who would later become Shadow Knight .

In 1985, Marvel followed up the series with Moon Knight – Fist Of Khonshu by Alan Zelenetz and Chris Warner, a six issue mini-series that established Moon Knight as suffering from schizophrenia due to the stress of his various aliases. Moon Knight appeared in Marvel Fanfare for two issues (#30 and #38) and in the pages of West Coast Avengers (#21–41 and Annual s #1–3), with the character written by Steven Englehart.

The issue takes us back to issue 1, where MK has just assessed his adversary, sight-unseen. Maybe you remember the incredulous beat cop who challenged Moon Knight’s authority to fight crime? Turns out, he has a bit of an inferiority complex, so gets it in his head that he should “replace” Moon Knight. It definitely has overtones of Mark David Chapman and John Lennon, but blown up to superhero proportions, as the dejected cop attempts to off MK with car bombs, guns, and darts. As they fight, the cop reveals that he’s desperate for the love Moon Knight receives, but that’s when Moon Knight drops a bomb of his own: he doesn’t want to be loved.

I’ve long seen total emotional distance as a kind of superpower — the kind of thing virtually nobody is willing to make the sacrifice for — but one that frees people from many of the obligations, fears, and anxieties they might otherwise have. Intriguingly, while the cop professes that he wants love, he’s willing to sacrifice his wife in order to get it, which immediately frames him as Spector’s opposite — while Spector doesn’t want love, but will protect individuals, Trent kills in order to get love.

Before I disappear into blowing my own mind, I’ve got to praise Shalvey for being able to cram so much story into each panel — it’s a lot easier for the dialogue to come off as a chiseled work of near-perfection when the art is doing so much heavy lifting. I mean, just look at how clearly this panel communicates everything we need to know about Trent.

InvestComics Facebook page –  HERE
InvestComics Instagram (Follow via mobile only) –  HERE
InvestComics Twitter –  HERE
InvestComics YouTube – HERE

Click on any RED  link or comic cover in the article to buy/bid on the comic right now from ALL available sellers on Ebay.

For many years on this site, InvestComics has spoken about Marvel’s White Knight. Now he gets the Spotlight treatment. This checklist is the most extensive Moon Knight checklist on the internet. What you will find are many first appearances, key books, creator books, covers, etc. It’s absolutely a bookmark spot on your pc/phone.

Moon Knight ( Marc Spector ) is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics . Created by Doug Moench and Don Perlin , the character first appeared in Werewolf by Night #32 (August 1975).

Moon Knight then gained a backup strip in Hulk! Magazine #11–15, #17–18, and #20, which saw the character first drawn with artist Bill Sienkiewicz on issues #13-15, 17-18, and #20 as well as a black and white story in the magazine publication Marvel Preview #21. Sienkiewicz's eclectic art style helped shed the early perception of Moon Knight as a mere Batman clone. [2] The Hulk backups and Marvel Preview issue, which were all written by Doug Moench, provided Moon Knight with a partial origin story and introduced one of his most notable recurring villains: Randall Spector, who would later become Shadow Knight .

In 1985, Marvel followed up the series with Moon Knight – Fist Of Khonshu by Alan Zelenetz and Chris Warner, a six issue mini-series that established Moon Knight as suffering from schizophrenia due to the stress of his various aliases. Moon Knight appeared in Marvel Fanfare for two issues (#30 and #38) and in the pages of West Coast Avengers (#21–41 and Annual s #1–3), with the character written by Steven Englehart.

Moon Knight ( Marc Spector ) is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics . Created by Doug Moench and Don Perlin , the character first appeared in Werewolf by Night #32 (August 1975).

Moon Knight then gained a backup strip in Hulk! Magazine #11–15, #17–18, and #20, which saw the character first drawn with artist Bill Sienkiewicz on issues #13-15, 17-18, and #20 as well as a black and white story in the magazine publication Marvel Preview #21. Sienkiewicz's eclectic art style helped shed the early perception of Moon Knight as a mere Batman clone. [2] The Hulk backups and Marvel Preview issue, which were all written by Doug Moench, provided Moon Knight with a partial origin story and introduced one of his most notable recurring villains: Randall Spector, who would later become Shadow Knight .

In 1985, Marvel followed up the series with Moon Knight – Fist Of Khonshu by Alan Zelenetz and Chris Warner, a six issue mini-series that established Moon Knight as suffering from schizophrenia due to the stress of his various aliases. Moon Knight appeared in Marvel Fanfare for two issues (#30 and #38) and in the pages of West Coast Avengers (#21–41 and Annual s #1–3), with the character written by Steven Englehart.

The issue takes us back to issue 1, where MK has just assessed his adversary, sight-unseen. Maybe you remember the incredulous beat cop who challenged Moon Knight’s authority to fight crime? Turns out, he has a bit of an inferiority complex, so gets it in his head that he should “replace” Moon Knight. It definitely has overtones of Mark David Chapman and John Lennon, but blown up to superhero proportions, as the dejected cop attempts to off MK with car bombs, guns, and darts. As they fight, the cop reveals that he’s desperate for the love Moon Knight receives, but that’s when Moon Knight drops a bomb of his own: he doesn’t want to be loved.

I’ve long seen total emotional distance as a kind of superpower — the kind of thing virtually nobody is willing to make the sacrifice for — but one that frees people from many of the obligations, fears, and anxieties they might otherwise have. Intriguingly, while the cop professes that he wants love, he’s willing to sacrifice his wife in order to get it, which immediately frames him as Spector’s opposite — while Spector doesn’t want love, but will protect individuals, Trent kills in order to get love.

Before I disappear into blowing my own mind, I’ve got to praise Shalvey for being able to cram so much story into each panel — it’s a lot easier for the dialogue to come off as a chiseled work of near-perfection when the art is doing so much heavy lifting. I mean, just look at how clearly this panel communicates everything we need to know about Trent.

Moon Knight (2014) 6 | Comics | Marvel.com


Moon Knight (2016) 6 | Comics | Marvel.com

Posted by 2018 article

41ygOdsNwkL